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How Writers Use Grammar for Style
 
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www.BeyondGrammarRules.com To be a powerful writer in fiction or nonfiction, your writing needs to be more than "correct." You need to know some grammar principles, not mere usage rules, to write with style. This video describes the true elements of style.
Views: 1280 Chris Olson
Creating A Style Guide & Voice - Business Writing & Grammar
 
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Click here for full course playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?feature=edit_ok&list=PL7x45KHuu46l1lMErNTx6gkTRMt48oRLV Good writing is one of the most neglected but critical ingredients for business success. Bad writing can compromise the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns and risk your relationship with customers, clients and employees. Great writing, however, has the power to not only make an excellent first impression, but to persuade people to listen to you. This course will walk you through everything you need to know in order to improve your advertisements, Facebook and twitter posts, email newsletters, B2B communications, business proposals and much more. It will also address the most common grammatical errors that professionals make, and how to correct them. For more information and resources, be sure to check out http://www.docstoc.com. There you'll have access to an array of valuable tools to help you start and grow a business. And for additional video courses, check out http://www.docstoc.com/courses
Views: 19455 docstocTV
Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century - with Steven Pinker
 
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Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Watch the Q&A here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rYAnYXIhL0 Buy Steven's book "The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century" - https://geni.us/WYZr In this brand-new talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter Product links on this page may be affiliate links which means it won't cost you any extra but we may earn a small commission if you decide to purchase through the link.
Views: 555929 The Royal Institution
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
7 Ways to Improve English Writing Skills | IELTS | EXAM | ESSAY | ACADEMIC #Spon
 
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How to improve English writing skills! This video will help with IELTS writing, academic writing, formal writing and university writing. I will show you 7 tips for writing exams, including information on IELTS linking words and English formal essay writing grammar and vocabulary. You can get 50USD/50EUR/3750RUB off your first month at Lingoda: http://bit.ly/2y0w6pd Click on the link above and use the voucher code: LUCY3 (Thank you to Lingoda for kindly sponsoring this video! I have worked with Lindoga for a long time now and I really love them as a company) Love, Lucy xoxo MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH OXFORD ENGLISH language course: https://englishll.com/lucy/ Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue £10 free makeup on FeelUnique: http://referme.to/9niUkCo Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCz4tgANd4yy8Oe0iXCdSWfA My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 FAQ: - Where are you from? I grew up in Bedfordshire, a county near London! - How many languages do you speak? I speak fluent Spanish and I'm learning Italian. You can see a video of me speaking Spanish here: https://goo.gl/4RVY0O - Which camera do you use? I use the Canon 60D (Discontinued - updated version here: (http://amzn.to/2z5I7K8) with a 50mm lens (http://amzn.to/2z7kgtq) - Which microphone do you use? I use the SONY ECMCS3 - Very affordable and great value for money: (http://amzn.to/2yOg9Sk) (Note that you will need this mic adapter if you want to use it with your iphone - http://amzn.to/2z6gNeD) I also use the Blue Yeti in vintage white for my voiceover work: http://amzn.to/2z4lHJa http://amzn.to/2yJPjLD - Which editing software do you use? Final Cut Pro X Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a #Spon in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.
Views: 467254 English with Lucy
PhD thesis writing style and grammar tips
 
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http://thefreeschool.education Free peer tuition online at: http://chat.thefreeschool.education The Free School. Supporting graduate research scholars.
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
How to write a good essay: Paraphrasing the question
 
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Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay introductions. This technique is called "paraphrasing", and it means rewriting something using different words. In this lesson, I will teach you how to paraphrase successfully and how to change essay questions into your own words. These skills are very useful for university and high school students, as well as any students writing English proficiency exams like the TOEFL or IELTS. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-write-a-good-essay-paraphrasing-the-question/ WATCH NEXT: Essay Writing – 6 ways to compare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8WSzwBD7GQ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to teach you something very important for if you're taking any type of test that has a writing component. So, if you are taking the IELTS, the TOEFL, the CELPIP, even just a university test, it can be any type of test, but if you're asked to write something like an essay or a paragraph, this video is for you. Okay? So I'm going to teach you a very important skill that will help improve your marks when it comes to writing on tests. So, let's get started. So, I have here an essay question. This question is actually... I've seen it on the IELTS. You know, you have similar types of questions on the TOEFL, sometimes in university. The question is this: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country. Do you agree or disagree?" Or maybe: "To what extent do you agree or disagree?" So, this is an example of a question you might be asked. Now, a problem a lot of students have is in their answer to this question. They see this, and they think: "Okay, education is the most important factor in the development of a country, yes, I agree." So then they... Or: "I disagree", and they start writing. And what do they write? Usually the very first thing students will write is this: "I agree that education is the single most important factor in the development of a country because..." So, what is the problem with this? Is there any problem to start off your essay with something like this, or to start off your answer? There's a big problem. So I want you to take a moment and think: "What could be the problem with starting your essay off with this sentence?" Okay, well, if you noticed, you have here the word: "education, education, is, is, the single most important, most important factor". If you notice, these are the same. They're the exact same, except for: "I agree that" and "because". The student, here, has used the exact same wording that is in the question. So, if you do this on the IELTS-and many students do this, same with on the TOEFL-you actually will lose marks, and same with in university, because you're not showing your abilities; you're just copying what somebody else has said or what the essay question is. So, in this video, I'm going to show you first off... First off, I'm going to tell you: Don't do this, don't copy. And I'm going to teach you ways in order to improve yourself and your answer by changing this wording. How can you change your introduction so it's different than what the question is? Okay? So, let's look at how to make these changes. Okay, so what we are going to do in order to change the question into a proper answer that doesn't just copy the question, is we are going to paraphrase. So, the word here is: "paraphrase". This might be a new word for you. What does it mean to paraphrase something? Well, when we paraphrase, it means we take a sentence that, you know... We take somebody else's sentence and we change it into our own words. Okay? So, we change the words of a sentence, we also change maybe the sentence structure, but we keep all the same meaning. Okay? So, the meaning from the sentence you copy, it stays the same, same meaning, but different words and different sentence structure. Okay? So it's in your words, but this other person's meaning. So, we are going to paraphrase this example of a question into our own words. So, first we're going to look at how to do that using vocabulary and synonyms. So, we have here the same question: "Education is the single most important factor in the development of a country." How can we put this into new words or our own words that keep the same meaning? Well, we can use synonyms. So, this might be a new word for you, too. A "synonym". "Synonyms" are words that have the same meaning, but are different words.
Grammar For Style & Clarity
 
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TEAS Prep - English and Language Usage - Grammar and Word Meanings in Context - Grammar for Style and Clarity - Coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjuctions, nominalization, active verbs, passive verbs
Views: 3181 Leslie Cox
WRITING – Advanced English Transitions: thereby, thereof, hereby, therein, wherein, whereby...
 
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Good writing makes use of transition words, thereby creating better flow and adding some style to the text. In this lesson we'll look at some linking words and transitions used to connect ideas, such as: "thereby", "thereof", "hereby", "therein", "wherein", "whereby", and more. This will make your writing clear and organized. Watch the video to improve your writing style. Now it's time for a lesson on some different transitions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsDR3XEv50E&index=103&list=PLxYD9HaZwsI5C0d8CivHvoI_-0rs8XMfc&t=0s TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON: https://www.engvid.com/writing-advanced-english-transitions TRANSCRIPT Hi again, everybody. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at transitions. Now, you may have seen some other videos on engVid about transitions, especially for writing. What we're going to look at today are a few more specific transitions, but this time we're not looking at transitions between paragraphs or even transitions between sentences. Okay? We're looking at transitions that we are generally using in a sentence to shift from one idea to another idea in a sentence. So they're very similar to, like, adverb... Adverb clauses, for example, but they're used in different ways. But, again, they do have their specific purposes. Now, you'll also notice that all of them or most of them start with: "there" plus a preposition, or "where" plus a preposition, and we have the one special one: "hereby". So: "Thereby", "Thereof", "Thereafter", "Therein", "Therefore", "Wherein", "Whereby", "Hereby", these are the words we're going to look at and how they're used within sentences. Now, before I explain these to you and show them... Show you samples of how they're used, I want you to understand that these are generally very formal, very high-end. They're not very commonly used. There are other ways you can say these things without being too serious, I guess you could say. But if you're going to university, if you're going to take a test, IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all these tests - you will see these and you should be able to use them as well. And if you can actually use them properly in your essays, and like, again, nicely, appropriately, good timing, your score... That'll help your score. It should go up quite a bit because these are not very easy to use. So, we're going to start with "thereby". "Thereby" basically means by which, or through which, or like through this action something happened. It's a little bit similar to: "due to". The only problem is you can't use it in the same structure as "due to". Okay? So let's look at the first sentence. "The team lost the final game of the season, thereby missing the playoffs." So, basically by doing this, by losing the last game, the result... What happened? They missed the playoffs. But notice that we are using an "ing" here: "...thereby missing the playoffs", right? This is basically a gerund expression, a gerund phrase, but we can't use this with a clause. We're using it with an "ing". So that's one thing you have to keep in mind. If I wanted to use "due to", I would have to change the whole structure. "Due to their loss in the final game of the season, the team missed the playoffs." A completely different structure. I'm using the independent clause, here, the "due to" with the cause, etc. This one gives you another option, basically, on how to link the ideas. Cause, effect. But we don't have to use the "ing", we can use another way. "Lisa studied for three straight weeks and was thereby able to pass her test." So she studied, studied, studied, and through this action she was able to pass her test. And: "...and was thereby", "...and she was thereby able". Notice that I'm not using this to start the clause; I'm using it within the clause, between the verbs to show through this action, this was the result that she was looking for. Okay? So: "by which", "through which action". Let's look at "therein". "The new contract does not allow for extended maternity leave;" here I'm using the semi-colon, I'm going to give you the next idea, so this is like a conjunction. "...therein lies the problem for the union, 60% of whose membership is young women". So, "therein" basically means in that, or into that situation, problem, position, state, etc. So, "therein". "Therein" means: In what? In this situation, in this new contract there's a problem. So: "...therein in this new contract lies a problem", and this is a very common follow-up to the transition "therein". "...therein lies the problem". A very famous expression: "...therein lies the rub" from Shakespeare. "Aye, there's the rub." I'm not sure if you know that expression, I think from Hamlet, dream to... If you dream and you can die, it's all good, but then: Oh, there's a problem - you don't wake up. So: "...therein lies the rub". A very common expression to use with "lies". […]
How to Improve English Writing Skills (without studying grammar)
 
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In this video, you'll learn how you can improve your written English by "copying the way native English speakers write." The writing exercise I share in this video has been used by many writers to sharpen their writing skills. It's my favorite way to practice my English writing.
Views: 134649 EngFluent
American English & British English - 8 Grammar Differences
 
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http://www.engvid.com American English or British English? Accent and pronunciation are not the only differences! I'll show you 8 grammatical differences between these two styles of English. Once you understand the differences, you can choose which style you prefer to use. The choice you make will influence your speaking and writing. So pay close attention to this lesson, and choose the style you find most comfortable with! Do you want to speak like an American, or like a Brit? Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/american-english-british-english-8-grammar-differences TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is some grammatical differences between American English and British English because although we speak the same language and we understand each other, we actually have two varieties of English and we have different rules; we have some different grammar that comes with that. So I think this video is interesting for you if you're learning English. And I suggest you use this video to just make sure that whichever variety you prefer that you take all the rules associated with that variety. So don't think: "Oh, I like the rule for collective nouns in American English, that's easier, I'll do that but for British English, it's easier to spell like that". Don't do that. Just keep it standard. Pick one, learn the rules, keep it standard that way. I also think this will be interesting to you if you're a native speaker, so if you're an American, you're a British person and you just want to compare just for interest's sake. So, let's get started. Number one: collective nouns. A collective noun represents a noun standing for a collection of individuals or not necessarily individuals, but within one bigger thing. So, a good example is government. Government, do you see it as one thing making decisions as the government speaking as one voice, or do you see it as a collection of different political parties, or even different individuals within one thing - the government? In British English, we can make our collective nouns singular or plural to reflect the fact that just because one thing is a group, it doesn't necessarily mean that they're speaking with one voice or one vision. So we can say: "Tom's family is", or: "are coming to visit". In British English. It just depends. Do you have a happy family? Are you one family happy unit or are you a collection of different individuals making up that family; mom, dad, your brothers, your sisters? In which case, you can use: "are". In British English, we can say that, whereas in American English, we have to just use the singular verb. Here's an example: "The government have cut spending". Government is seen as one thing, so we use the singular verb. Moving on now, rule number two. We have different spelling rules also. Here's one to consider: spelling for "ed" words. In American English, it's generally preferred to spell with "ed". Let me tell you a story about something on my other YouTube channel. I have a video there that generates quite a lot of negative comments sometimes because I say something about Americans and they're not very, very happy when they watch it and sometimes people get really angry. And in a comment, somebody was like: "Hey, you can't even spell! You should spell 'learned' with 'ed', not a 't'". And she was like really angry, said all this stuff in there; taking the video way too seriously. And then, it started a bit of a comment thread, and people were like: "Hey, you're embarrassing Americans - you can spell it that way" and things like this. So, that's a good example of how when you... When you're used to your variety... I'm used to British English mainly, I'll sometimes see something in the American variety that confuses me. So obviously that girl hadn't seen "learnt" spelt with a "t" before which is okay in British English.
WRITING STYLE 7: Choosing Adverbials
 
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This is the seventh lesson in Dr. Chandler's online guide to writing. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 3364 demarcations
7 Best Free Grammar Checker Tools to Correct English Writing Errors
 
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Correct Your English Grammar and Punctuation Errors Online Using These tools: #1: Grammarly: https://pxlme.me/y0YzODvU #2: GingerSoftware: https://pxlme.me/W18hHHYU #3: ProWritingAid: https://pxlme.me/tlUl221c #4: Paper Rater: http://go.chamal.co/7h8MSjAn #5: PolishMyWriting: https://link.upcontests.com/polishmywriting #6: LanguageTool: https://link.upcontests.com/languagetool #7: GramMark: https://link.upcontests.com/grammark ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Check out the article about best free grammar and punctuation tools: https://www.pitiya.com/online-grammar-checker-and-punctuation-checker-tools.html Writing grammar error-less articles is always a tough task. Even though English is your primary language, chances are you still would make dozens of grammatical errors. Which are not only limited to grammar and punctuation errors but also, wordiness, sentence structure, active & passive voice, apostrophe, comma, conjunction implementation, adverbs, and adjectives are some of few. Considering best grammar and punctuation checker tools online, Grammarly grammar checker and Ginger Grammar checker are apparently the top two best grammar checker tools. However, tools like LanguageTool, GramMark and other open source grammar checking applications and tools chase it up pretty quickly to make the world a better (and a fair) place for everyone. If you're looking for free grammar checker tools, you should check out the above tools. If you're in doubt between Grammarly vs. Ginger, then you should read the comparison article below: https://www.pitiya.com/grammarly-vs-ginger.html You know when your essay has grammar errors, you get more trouble. Similarly, if your blog posts or assignments have grammatical mistakes, you will lose the credibility. By using these free grammar checker apps, you can correct English grammar easily and quickly. For example, if you are using Grammarly grammar checker, then you will see options to select that make the grammar correction is relevant. That means you know sometimes when different grammar checker software used, it actually creates the ambiguity and messes up your article. However, Grammarly has improved their grammar checking technology and using advanced methods to make your article errorless. If you are using Grammarly, then you can check grammar on Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, Blogspot, Tumblr, Squarespace and anywhere there is a text field! If you are a student and looking for quick ways to correct grammar and punctuation on your articles, essays, and documents, then use one of these tools. And especially if you are from a country where English isn't the primary language or you are not familiar with English, but still want to correct English grammar online free, then use one of these grammar and punctuation checkers. Grammarly particularly is very helpful because it analyzes your content and suggests similar words or synonyms. It makes your content not only easy to read, but also is rich. Many non-English speakers aren't familiar with lots of vocabulary words. Grammarly makes it very easy to find synonyms and replace with existing ones in a single click! Let us know what your favorite grammar checker tools are by commenting below.
Views: 15508 Online Marketing
WRITING STYLE 4: Clauses and Coordination
 
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This is the fourth lesson in Dr. Chandler's series on writing style. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 5658 demarcations
APA Style - Grammar and Usage
 
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This video explains correct grammar and usage according to APA style.
Views: 2663 Dr. Todd Grande
WRITING STYLE 9: Appositives and Absolutes
 
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This is the ninth lesson in Dr. Chandler's online guide to writing. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 4871 demarcations
Academic style grammar
 
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Description This workshop offers useful advice on academic grammar to use in research writing.
Views: 7 Jenander56
Grammatical Errors: 120 Common Grammar Mistakes in English And How to Avoid Them
 
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List of 170+ common grammatical errors in English and how to correct them. https://7esl.com/grammar-mistakes/ 50 common grammar mistakes with American English pronunciation (Grammatical errors part I): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cx4sxN01qKA ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WATCH MORE: ★ Grammar: https://goo.gl/7n226T ★ Vocabulary: https://goo.gl/E5Ty4T ★ Expressions: https://goo.gl/JBpgCF ★ Phrasal Verbs: https://goo.gl/Ux3fip ★ Idioms: https://goo.gl/y7wNjN ★ Conversations: https://goo.gl/pmdpQT ★ Kids Vocabulary: https://goo.gl/Xr3G68 ★ English Writing: https://goo.gl/46gmY7 ★ IELTS: https://goo.gl/Tg2U4v ★ TOEFL: https://goo.gl/8Zwvic ★ British vs. American English: https://goo.gl/VHa5W8 ★ Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/P4eR39 ★ Business English: https://goo.gl/r7jqtB ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- OUR SOCIAL MEDIA: Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/7english/ Facebook: https://www.fb.com/7ESLLearningEnglish/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/7ESL1 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and lessons visit: https://7esl.com/
Views: 114075 7 E S L
How to Write Numbers | Grammar Lessons
 
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Watch more Grammar Lessons videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/515803-How-to-Write-Numbers-Grammar-Lessons If you find your self needing to write a number, you might question whether you should spell it out, used the word or you should use the numeral. Well, this is really a matter of style so it depends on who your writing for and what's style guide your following but one of the most common style guide is the associated press style book and so I'll give you the AP rule, but just note that whenever your this you might wanna look up the style of which ever publication you are writing for. The AP style book, suggest that whenever you have a number one trough nine you spell it out and when you have a number great than nine you used the numeral. When will you can remember this is that if you have a number that is at least two digits like 10, we wanna use the numeral but if we have a number that's one digit like let's say seven, we wanna write it out. So the AP does two exceptions, they say that whenever your writing an age or measurement you should use the numeral, so that's even if the age is two digits or more, say your wanna say that someone is 13 years old, you would write "He is 13 years old" Using the numeral, if I wanna say "He is 6 feet tall" It would look like this, again were using the numeral and in this case were hyphenating 6 and feet because there forming an adjective phrase to describe how tall he is. I hope that, that gives you some good information about how to use numbers, when to spell them out and when to use the numeral. Always remember to check the style guide that your using and if you don't use a style guide, the important thing is that you be consistent trough out what ever your writing.
Views: 23642 Howcast
Parallelism: The secret to great writing
 
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Parallelism or parallel structure is one of the secrets of great writing. It gives greater balance and power to the way you communicate. It will help you get higher grades, improve your job prospects, and look more professional. In this lesson, I explain all about parallelism -- what it is and how to use it correctly. This easy but important lesson will take your English to a higher level. Follow up by watching my lesson on the Magic of 3 to strengthen your English even more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FcAub-xqGQ&index=94&list=PLxSz4mPLHWDZgp8e6i0oyXOOrTAAaj0O7&t=0s Take the quiz on this lesson here: https://www.engvid.com/parallelism-great-writing/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. This lesson is for you if you want to learn how to communicate more powerfully in just a short time. This lesson is about something called: "Parallelism" or "Parallel Structure". Now, in case you've never heard of it, or if you've heard of it but you're not sure what it is, I just want to tell you that it's something really important, especially in academic circles or in the business world. All right? And also socially. So, whether you're speaking, or whether you're writing, this principle of parallelism will help you to communicate more effectively. So, first of all, what is parallelism? So, it's a speaking or writing technique in which you communicate more powerfully by balancing different parts of your sentence, and I'm going to show you lots of examples so you understand exactly. So, when we create a sentence that has parallel structure, it means that when we have a list of items in our sentence, all of the forms of speech should be the same. For example, you have verbs, verbs, verbs; nouns and nouns; adjectives and adjectives; adverbs and adverbs. Now, that seems obvious, but in real life when people speak and write, they don't always do that. So I'm going to show you: "What are the benefits of using parallelism?" and also exactly how to use them in a sentence. So, some of the benefits that you will get when you start creating sentences with parallel structure are that your sentences will have more weight, they'll be more balanced, they'll have more rhythm to them, they'll have more style, more clarity (they'll be more clear), and also you'll be able to emphasize things more. And as a result of all that, your speaking or your writing will be much more dramatic and much more powerful. And you may not realize why, but it's really important that this parallel structure exists. Now, in addition, it's not just something to make it better, it's not just something to improve your communication. In academic circles, if you don't follow these parallel structure rules, it's actually considered a mistake in writing; it's considered very weak writing, bad writing, poor writing, and you will get lower grades as a result of that. Okay? So it's really important, especially if you're in the academic world or writing anything serious or in the business world, to write this way. Let's look at some simple examples first. Okay? So, this sentence, the first one: "Janet sings and dances." So here, what do we see? We see verbs and verbs: "Janet sings and dances." If somebody didn't write this sentence properly, they might write: "Janet sings and is dancing." Now, here it didn't match because this was present simple, so this should be a verb in the present simple; they should both be verbs, they should both be in the same tense, and so on. Okay? Let's look at more examples. "We enjoy reading and cooking." Here we have two gerunds: "reading", "cooking". Next: "I like to watch movies and to travel abroad." Okay? Now, you see how that seems really balanced? Okay? So we have: "to watch movies", so we have an infinitive and a noun, and "to travel abroad". "To travel", infinitive and a... Well, it's not a noun, but it's like a noun, it functions like a noun. Next: "The reasons for my view are political, cultural, and social." So here we have three adjectives. Now, up til now we had two, now we have three. And if you've watched my earlier lesson on: "The Power of Three" or "The Magic of Three", you will know that this is really special. This is like parallelism on steroids. This is like the best kind of writing you can do, and a lot of very famous leaders and writers write this way, using parallelism in threes to make things much more effective. So, if you haven't watched that other lesson, I will tell you where you can get it; it's called: "The Magic of Three" on our website. So: "The reasons for my view are political, cultural, and social." Three adjectives. "The police acted quickly and carefully." Okay? So we have here: "quickly", "carefully", two adverbs. And last: "We enjoy comedies, dramas, and documentaries." So you have here three nouns. Right? So that's what's important: nouns with nouns, adverbs with adverbs, adjectives with adjectives - you get the idea. Okay? Now, if you get the idea, work with me, stay with me. […]
Following Narnia Writing Lessons in Structure, Style, Grammar   IEW
 
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FREE shipping from http://http://howtohomeschoolmychild.com/narnia IEW Following Narnia Writing Lessons from Institute for Excellence in Writing following Teaching Writing in Structure and Style - Complete review at http://http://howtohomeschoolmychild.com/narnia
Views: 1293 Kerry Beck
12 Common Errors in Academic English – and how to fix them!
 
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What's "academic writing"? If you're in school or university, you must know the difference between general English and academic English. Watch this important lesson to avoid the most common mistakes students make in academic writing. In your own language, the difference between these two modes of writing might not be that great, but in English, there are a lot of differences depending on the context. So even if you know your grammar and write a correct sentence, you might still be wrong because the structure or tone was not appropriate for an academic setting! Watch this video and learn how to write correctly and get higher grades in an academic environment. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/12-common-errors-in-academic-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca. And in today's lesson, I'll explain twelve common errors that students make in academic English. Now, what's academic English? It's the English that you need to use in school, college, or university when you're reading, writing, listening, and speaking -- okay -- ideally, but most importantly, when you're writing. Now, what's the difference between academic English and general English? Well, academic English in general -- there are many differences, but in general, academic English is more formal; it's more objective, and also, it has to use a lot of referencing. You always have to let people know where you got your information from. You have to cite the source. You have to give the source. You can't claim to write something and claim it as your own. Okay? If you do that, that's called "plagiarism". It's a very serious offense in academic circles. But today, we're not going to talk about how to reference a source. We're going to talk about the two other aspects: How to write more formally and objectively, and what are the ten common errors that students make when they are not formal enough. Okay? So not ten, twelve. Here we go. So first of all, using contractions. All of these are what you should not do, okay? So avoid using contractions. Sorry. In this case, don't use contractions at all. So don't say "don't"; say "do not". Don't say "isn't"; say "is not". All right? That's academic English. Next, avoid phrasal verbs. So for example, instead of saying "go up" -- "Prices went up. -- say, "Prices increased." Instead of saying "take away", say "removed". Avoid these multi-part verbs. All right? It's not as formal. Next, avoid idioms. Instead of saying, "It was A1", say, "It was excellent." All right? Avoid slang. Don't say "kids"; say "children". Use the proper terminology for various subjects. Avoid pronouns. So for example, instead of saying, "You can see from the graph..." -- all right. We use the pronoun "you". Instead of that, say, "The graph shows..." all right? Next, avoid negatives. For example, instead of saying, "Something is not effective", just say, "It is ineffective." Instead of saying something is "not positive", say, "It's negative." So avoid these kinds of negatives. Next, avoid clichés. Now, what are "clichés"? "Clichés" are a kind of idiom, basically -- commonly used expressions. All right? And so on. Kind of a common wisdom about different things. And so you want to avoid these kinds of expressions. For example, instead of saying, "When all is said and done" -- all right? We use that in conversation, but you don't want to use it in your academic writing. Instead of saying that, you'd probably use an expression like "in conclusion". All right? So next, there are certain kinds of punctuation -- there are actually lots of rules about punctuation. And the kind of punctuation, the style of punctuation that you use in academic writing depends on the style guide that you have been asked to follow in your school, college, or university. Some very well-known style guides are the MLA or APA. These are certain style guides, and they tell you everything about how you need to write, what rules you need to follow, what are the rules of punctuation and of quotations marks, of this and that. Okay? A lot more than what I'm covering here. But in general, I can just tell you that we don't see that many exclamation marks in academic writing, okay? We do see a lot of semicolons. All right? That's kind of -- when do we use a semicolon? Do you remember? Okay. What's the difference between a period and a semicolon? A period clearly divides two sentences. And a semicolon has one sentence which is a complete sentence; then you put the semicolon. You do not capitalize the next letter, and the next sentence is connected, and you want to show that it's connected to the first sentence, which is a very academic, intellectual, philosophical thing to do. So learn to use semicolons if you're in university especially.
50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English Grammar - Error Identification & Correction
 
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Find out if you make the 50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English, and learn how to avoid them. See all GRAMMAR LESSONS here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. ***** ALSO CHECK OUT ***** 1. PARTS OF SPEECH LESSONS: https://goo.gl/ouZgqu 2. TENSES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/7t5Hkg 3. MODAL VERBS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 4. CONDITIONALS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/prd7ex 5. ARTICLES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/3xdcJP
Views: 895607 Learn English Lab
Embrace English Grammar "writing style"
 
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-- Created using Powtoon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
English Grammar (Advanced) — Inversion
 
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Not only do inverted sentences give your writing some style, they also get you higher points on the IELTS or TOEFL essay score. In this video we look at another complex sentence structure that you can add to your toolbox for better English writing. In inverted clauses (such as the one above) the verb comes before the subject. This structure is very formal and is not limited to clauses beginning with NOT ONLY. There are many examples of inversions, such as: Hardly had she arrived… Should you feel inclined to… Neither do you. And many more. There is a lot to take in in this lesson, but recognizing these structures will not only make your writing better, it will help your reading as well (notice that not only in the last sentence does not lead to an inversion—find out why in the video). Don’t forget to visit https://www.writetotop.com for more of our original content. See our Idea Banks (full of useful vocab): http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Would you like to help make Write to the Top even better? Support us: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 10116 Write to Top
WRITING STYLE 8: Choosing Adjectives
 
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This is the eighth part of Dr. Chandler's series on writing style. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 3990 demarcations
8 Common Grammar Mistakes in English!
 
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"What's the different"? "Today morning"? "I enjoyed"? Improve your grammar by correcting the common mistakes in these English sentences. A good review for all students, especially at intermediate and advanced levels. Also check our full resource of 100 Common Grammar Mistakes in English at http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/50-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english/ Quiz: http://www.engvid.com/8-common-grammar-mistakes-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. In this lesson, you'll have a chance to review eight common English errors. So, let's see how you do. The first one: "Today morning I woke up late." So, what's wrong with that? There is actually something wrong with each and every one of these. I'll tell you that in advance; there's no... There are no tricks here. Okay? So, what's wrong with that sentence? "Today morning I woke up late." Well, it should be: "This morning". Okay? We don't say: "Today morning". We say: "This morning". Number two: "What's the different?" What's the different? Well, that's wrong too, because "different" is an adjective. What you want to use here is the noun. So, what's the noun of this word? "Difference". "What's the difference?" Okay? This is a really common error, so make sure you don't make this one. Next one: "I met John two years before." Okay? What's wrong with that? Well, over here, we can't say: "I met John two years before." We can say: "I met two... I met John two years ago." All right? If you use the word "before", then you have to say before something. "Before I graduated". Okay? "Before I got married", or whatever. But you can't use "before" by itself. So the proper word there is "ago". "I met John two years ago." Next one: "This is a six-months course." That sounds almost okay, but it's not okay. So the mistake here is with the "s". When we use this expression, it becomes... The entire expression becomes an adjective for the noun "course". So we should say: "This is a six-month course.", "This is a million dollar contract." And so on. Okay? That's another... Each of these is a different element of grammar, different aspect of grammar, and so on. Next, number five: "Thank you. I really enjoyed." What's wrong with that? Well, the problem is here. "Enjoyed" is a reflexive verb, so you would need to say: "I really enjoyed myself.", "I really enjoyed myself.", "He enjoyed himself.", "She enjoyed herself.", "We enjoyed ourselves.", "They enjoyed themselves." Okay? So there are certain reflexive verbs in English, and we need to use them correctly. That's one of them. Very common one. Okay, number six: "Did you loose your cellphone?" What's wrong with that? I helped you a little bit by actually showing you where the error is. So, many people make this error. This is actually a spelling mistake. You should be spelling the word this way. "Did you lose your cellphone?" "Loose" is an adjective which means not tight, and "lose" is the opposite of "find". Okay? "Did you lose your cellphone?" Also, the pronunciation is "lose" and not "loose". Next one: "This is an academic course.", "This is an academic course." So, what was wrong with what I said there? Okay? So, what was wrong was my pronunciation of that. So many people mispronounce this word. It is not "academic". It is "academic". The stress is on the middle. Academic. "This is an academic course.", "This is an academic program." Okay? So, if... In case you make that mistake. I'm not saying you do. In case you do, make sure you correct it. Last one: "Yes, I have a free time." Is that...? What's wrong there? What's going on? Okay, here. We don't need to say: "A free time". We need to say: "Free time", because this is a... Time is an uncountable noun. Now, each one of these examples represents a different aspect of grammar. So, how can you possibly learn all of them? Well, I'll give you two easy ways to help you out. One is to go to our website: www.engvid.com, because there, we have currently I think more than 700 lessons on different aspects of English grammar and of English in general for exams, for writing, speaking, all kinds of things. And by watching them, you can find the lessons that you actually need. And the other thing is that we also have... I've written actually a resource which might help you, which shows 50 such common errors that people make in English, and that might help you out as well. Okay? So, I hope you did well, and I hope you continue to do better and better in English. All the best with your English. Bye for now.
3 Writing Styles - APA, Chicago & MLA (Examrace - Dr. Manishika)
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this vide explains the 3 main Writing Styles APA, Chicago, MLA. Citiations: Why Important? Formatting in research papers Standard acceptable method for citiation Avoids plagiarism Builds your credibility and shows that your ideas are shared by other scholars studying in the same field Provide all of the information so that reader can find the book/article cited Citations: Why Important? @0:33 Chicago (Turabian) @3:06 APA Style @6:11 MLA Style @9:28 Writing Style Differences @10:06 #Parenthetical #Criminal #Association #Appears #Footnotes #Superscripted #Credibility #Plagiarism #Citations #Manishika #Examrace Chicago (Turabian) Used since 1906 For all subject matter: historical journals, geography, sociology, anthropology & social sciences By University of Chicago Press Uses Footnotes – by Superscripted numerals Or Use In-Text Citations Use only page number on upper right, if heading appears on top then use page number at bottom Entire first and last name APA Style Origin: 1929 Social sciences: Business, criminal justice, economics, law Medical subjects: Nursing and psychology Create by American Psychological Association Uses only In-text citations Page number on upper right with title on left Only the initials of the first and middle name of each author Reduce bias in writing about gender, race, and other areas where discrimination is possible Year in Focus: If the research study citing is current and recent, or an arcane example of an "earlier theory" which has been debunked MLA Style 1st published by Modern Language Association of America in 1985. Used in humanities & literature Features brief parenthetical citations in the text keyed to an alphabetical list of works cited that appears at the end of the work (Smith 126) Writing Style Differences ACS (American Chemical Society) - Chemistry AIP (American Institute of Physics) - Physics ALWD (Association of Legal Writing Directors) - Legal Studies AMA (American Medical Association) - Medical Sciences AMS (American Mathematical Society) - Mathematics APSA (American Political Science Association) - Political Science, International Studies ASA (American Sociological Association) - Sociology AP (Associated Press) - Journalism, Public Relations Bluebook - Legal Studies CSE (Council of Science Editors) - Biology Harvard Business School - Business LSA (Linguistic Society of America) - Linguistics Maroonbook - Legal Studies NLM (National Library of Medicine) - Medicine Get complete postal course at http://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm For deatiled solutions to past paper questions visit: https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/UGC/Paper-1/ Examrace is number 1 education portal for competitive and scholastic exam like UPSC, NET, SSC, Bank PO, IBPS, NEET, AIIMS, JEE and more. We provide free study material, exam & sample papers, information on deadlines, exam format etc. Our vision is to provide preparation resources to each and every student even in distant corners of the globe. Dr. Manishika Jain served as visiting professor at Gujarat University. Earlier she was serving in the Planning Department, City of Hillsboro, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA with focus on application of GIS for Downtown Development and Renewal. She completed her fellowship in Community-focused Urban Development from Colorado State University, Colorado, USA. For more information - https://www.examrace.com/About-Examrace/Company-Information/Examrace-Authors.html
Views: 69081 Examrace
E2 IELTS Writing | How to score 8+ in Writing Task 2 with Jay!
 
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In this video, Jay from E2Language shares the most important tips there are for a high score in IELTS Writing Task 2. You'll be surprised at how some pretty simple strategies can lift your scores from 7 to 8. Jay himself took this test four times in order to really get to the bottom of why people continually get low scores. Check out the top, authentic tips needed to get 8+ on test day! Have a read of Jay's IELTS experience on the blog: http://bit.ly/2l1kTii Sign up for IELTS here: http://bit.ly/2ntt8Q7 Sign up to E2School Here: https://www.e2school.com/ Learn English online at E2School. E2School is your online English school. We help students learn English from beginner to advanced. We have a range of courses that make up our two programs. Our General English Program has three courses- beginner English, intermediate English and advanced English. The beginner course also helps you with the Cambridge KEY (KET) A2 test. The intermediate course can help you with the Cambridge Preliminary (PET) B1 test. The advanced course helps you with the Cambridge First (FCE) B2 test. Our second program is designed to help people preparing for their IELTS, PTE, OET and TOEFL exams improve their English skills including an English Grammar course, SpeakingLab, our English pronunciation course and TestReady, our multi-skill and vocabulary course. Do you like these FREE videos? You can show your appreciation by DONATING a small amount of $ here: http://www.paypal.me/e2language -- even the smallest contribution will mean a LOT! E2Language offers online face-to-face tutorials run by expert English language teachers from all over the world! Visit our website for IELTS test preparation packages on offer: http://bit.ly/2otr0fi Follow us on social media for helpful tips and updates regarding IELTS preparation and the IELTS speaking: Blog: https://blog.e2language.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/e2language/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/e2language Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e2language/ Jay's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e2jay/
Views: 1568004 E2 IELTS
PUNCTUATION MASTERCLASS - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes - Comma, Semicolon, Period, Etc.
 
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Learn PUNCTUATION Easily in 30 Minutes in this Punctuation Masterclass. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix In this lesson, you will learn the rules for using: - period/full stop (.) - exclamation mark (!) - question mark (?) - comma (,) - semicolon (;) - colon (:) - apostrophe (') Partial transcript: Hello, and welcome back. In this lesson, I’m going to teach you the rules for using the seven most important punctuation marks, so that you can write correct English without making mistakes. There are exercises within the lesson to help you practice, and as always there is a final quiz at the end of the video. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin. We’re going to start with terminal punctuation. ‘Terminal’ means the end, so terminal punctuation marks are what we use to end a sentence. There are three of these: the period or the full stop, the exclamation mark, and the question mark. Let’s look at the period first. This mark is called the period in American English (AmE means American English), and it’s called the full stop in British English. It is used to mark the end of declarative and imperative sentences. I’ll explain. Here are some examples: “I teach English.” “We had pizza for dinner last night.” “If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella.” These sentences are called declarative sentences because they declare something; they give us some information. And at the end of each sentence, you see a period or full stop. Imperative sentences are commands or requests: “Please don’t feed the animals.” You might see this on a sign in a zoo. “Let me know what time your flight arrives.” “If it rains tomorrow, bring your umbrella.” Let’s now turn to the exclamation mark. It is used to convey strong emotion or feeling. Have a look at these two sentences: Both of them mean the same thing. The first sentence, which ends in a period, has no special feeling or emotion; it’s like saying “I’m really excited about my new job.” Doesn’t sound like I’m very excited, does it? That’s why we use the exclamation mark: “I’m really excited about my new job!” – it tells our reader to read the sentence with emotion – in this sentence, the emotion is excitement. This next sentence: “If you come to work late tomorrow, you’re fired!” Imagine a manger saying this to an employee. So, this expresses anger. In the same way, you can show many other feelings including surprise, joy, fear etc. using the exclamation mark. Now, both of these sentences are declarative, but you can also use the exclamation mark in an imperative sentence like this one: “Johnny, don’t play with your food!” You can imagine a mother saying that angrily to her son. So, it’s a strong or strict command. Another place where we use the exclamation mark is after interjections. Here are a couple of sentences: “Ouch! You just stepped on my foot!” “Wow! What a beautiful house!” Interjections are words like “ouch” and “wow” which are used to express feelings. So, remember: if you want to convey strong emotion in a sentence, put an exclamation mark at the end of it. If there’s no special feeling, just end the sentence with a period. OK, let’s turn now to the third terminal punctuation symbol: the question mark. It is used to mark the end of a question. So, it’s very straightforward: if a sentence is a question, then put a question mark at the end of it. Here are some examples: “What do you do?” “Are we allowed to feed the animals?” “If it rains tomorrow, should I bring my umbrella?” “Are you excited about your new job?” “Who lives in that house?” So, the rule is: if a sentence is a question, it must end with a question mark. Alright, let’s do a small exercise now. There are four sentences on the screen. I want you to add periods or full stops, exclamation marks and question marks where necessary. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video and check. OK, here are the answers. If you want, stop the video again, check your answers, then play the video and continue. Before we move on to the next topic, a quick note on spacing. Notice that there is no space between the last letter of a sentence and the terminal punctuation mark. If you put a space there, it’s wrong. But, when you begin a new sentence, you should leave a space after the terminal mark, and you should start the new sentence with a capital letter.
Views: 758463 Learn English Lab
Writing: Grammar, Usage, and Style
 
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Title: Writing: Grammar, Usage and Style Authors: Jean Eggenschwiler and Emily Dotson Biggs Language: English
Views: 404 Franco Msgl
WRITING STYLE 5: Subordination
 
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This is the fifth lesson in Dr. Chandler's series on writing style. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 4900 demarcations
Active vs. Passive Voice | Grammar Lessons
 
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Watch more Grammar Lessons videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/515781-Active-vs-Passive-Voice-Grammar-Lessons One of the fastest ways to improve your writing is to learn the difference between the active voice and the passive voice, and to adopt the active voice as often as you can. But before we can start to write in the active voice, we do need to know the difference. So the active voice is a sentence in which the actor, or the subject, comes before the action, or the verb. For this example, "Batman threw Joker from a seventy-story building." Let's find the verb. In this case, it's threw. That's the action. And so our actor, or our subject, is Batman. And you can see that this is an active sentence, because we lead with our subject, we go into our verb, and then we go into our object, which is the person receiving the action. The result is a really active sentence. The active voice kind of sounds the way you think it would. The sentence moves in a very logical fashion. There is a lot of momentum in the sentence. If you wrote that sentence in the passive voice, it would look like this. Joker was thrown from the building my Batman. In this case, our subject comes last, our verb is up here, and our object is the Joker who's leading the sentence. So you can it's a kind of backward construction, which can slow the reader down, because we are starting with the receiver of an action, rather than the person who is initiating the action. Another way to look at passive construction, you might see a sentence that looks like this. Joker was thrown from the building. And in this case, the person who did the throwing doesn't even appear in the sentence. So oftentimes, a passive voice can sort of hide the actor. This can be useful. Say you're writing and email to a boss, and you need to say that your boss forgot to pay you that week. You might say something like, "My check did not arrive," without saying who neglected to mail the check. So sometimes the passive voice can be your friend, but in general active voice leads to stronger writing and a much more compelling reading experience.
Views: 266495 Howcast
English Grammar and Style | UQx on edX | Course About Video
 
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English Grammar and Style Learn how to use a knowledge of how words work to write in the style that readers value and that the university and the professions require. Register for English Grammar and Style from the University of Queensland at https://www.edx.org/course/uqx/uqx-write101x-english-grammar-style-1766 About this Course In the time-starved Internet world, where everyone’s a writer and everyone’s a reader, the demand for literacy is more intense than it has ever been. The ability to articulate ideas in smart, tight writing is crucial. Write101x will enable you to learn how words work so that you can write the concise, lucid, nuanced, and compelling prose that is so valued by readers. By providing you with a thorough grounding in grammar, syntax, and style, the course will sharpen and solidify your writing and editing competence and self-confidence.
Views: 33371 edX
Topic 66 | Grammar and Punctuations | Sentence Structure & Personal Style | Creative Writing
 
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Topic 66 | Grammar and Punctuations | Sentence Structure & Personal Style | Creative Writing
Views: 0 Tech Savvy
The 4 English Sentence Types – simple, compound, complex, compound-complex
 
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Did you know there are only four sentence types in English? To improve your writing and reading skills in English, I'll teach you all about simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences in this grammar video. You'll learn how to identify the independent and dependent clauses. Don't worry, it's easier than it sounds! By learning to identify and use these sentence structures, you'll make your writing more interesting and dynamic. I'll also share many example sentences in the lesson, so you can practice with my help. http://www.engvid.com/the-4-english-sentence-types-simple-compound-complex-compound-complex/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is a writing lesson, but it's also a spoken English lesson. It's about anything to do with English, because we're going to be looking at sentence types. Now, of course, when you speak, you're using all kinds of sentence types. But, especially in writing, it's important to know the different types of sentences, because, especially if you're going to be writing tests, they want to see sentence variety. And even if you're not writing tests, anything you write, if you're using only one type of sentence, your writing becomes very bland, very boring, very hard to follow, because it's a little bit monotone. So what you need to do is you need to vary... You need a variety of sentence structures in your writing to give it a little bit more life. Okay? Luckily, you only need to know four sentence types. We have simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and compound-complex. Now, this is not exactly easy, but it's not exactly hard, either. If you figure out what you need to have in each one, in each sentence type, just make sure it's there. Okay? Let's start. A simple sentence has one independent clause. A little bit of review: What is an independent clause? An independent clause has a subject and a verb, and can complete an idea. It can stand by itself, because the idea in that clause is complete. I don't need to add anything else to it. Okay. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses, joined by a conjunction. A compound conjunction: "and", "but", "or", "so", "for" (not very common), etc. So, we join two independent clauses with a compound conjunction. You can have more, but again, you have to be a little bit careful. Once you get to three, start to look for a way to finish your sentence, because if you get to the fourth, you already have a crazy sentence that has the... Runs the risk of being a run-on sentence. Eventually, you're going to make a mistake, you're going to miss something, and the whole sentence falls apart. I don't recommend three, but you can put three. Then we have a complex sentence. A complex sentence has one independent clause, plus one or more dependent clause. A dependent clause is a clause that has a subject and a verb, but cannot stand by itself. It is not a complete idea. It has some sort of relationship to the independent clause. We have three types of dependent clauses. We have noun clauses, we have adjective clauses, and we have adverb clauses. Okay? That's a whole separate lesson. You can look at that later. But you have to have one of these, plus one of these, and you have a complex sentence. Next we have a compound-complex sentence. Here you have two or more independent clauses, again, joined by a conjunction, and one or more dependent clause. Okay? So you have basically all the elements in this sentence. Then, once you have all this stuff, you can add as many complements, or basically extras, as you want. So, let's look at an example. We're going to start with the simple sentence: "Layla studied biology." Very simple. I have a subject, I have a verb, I have an object. Okay? This is a simple sentence. It's an independent clause; it can stand by itself as a complete idea. Now, I can add anything I want to this that is not another clause of any type, and it'll still be a simple sentence. So I can say: "My friend Layla studied biology in university." I'll just say "uni" for short. I have more information, but do I have a different type of sentence? No. It's still a simple sentence. Now, let's look at this sentence. First, let me read it to you: "Even with the weather being that nasty, the couple and their families decided to go ahead with the wedding as planned." Now you're thinking: "Wow, that's got to be a complex sentence", right? "It's so long. There's so much information in it." But, if we look at it carefully, it is still a simple sentence. Why? Because we only have one independent clause. Where is it? Well, find the subject and verb combination first. So, what is the subject in this sentence? I'll give you a few seconds, figure it out. Hit the pause key, look at it. Okay, we're back. Here is the subject: "the couple and their families". Now, don't get confused with this "and".
Advanced English Grammar: Participles
 
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Using participles correctly will dramatically improve the quality of your English writing. If you're learning English for university, IELTS, TOEFL, or for your career, this advanced writing lesson is for you! You will learn to analyze sentences so that you can understand them fully and write your own. Often, English learners are unsure of whether an "-ing" word is an adjective or an adverb. In this lesson, you'll learn how the participle "having" includes the subject, verb, and conjunction. I'll show you many example sentences, and you can practice what you've learned on our quiz at https://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-grammar-participles/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at participles. Now, this is a little bit more advanced grammar, but it's very useful and it's used in everyday speaking, but especially for writing and reading because you're going to see participles everywhere. What participles do is they help you get sentence variety, they help you make your sentences shorter, if necessary, they give you a little bit of style. Okay? There are two participles that we need to look at, they are called the active or passive participle. Sometimes you'll see them as present or past participle. Past participles, you're familiar with. Sometimes they're called the verb three, so: "eat", past tense "ate", past participle is "eaten". Right? So that's the participle. Now, especially with the "ing" you have to be careful because "ing" words, although they are verbs with "ing", they can be pretty much anything. They could be a gerund, as you know, so they're nouns; they could be part of the continuous verb, so "be going", so: "I am going", it's a continuous action; but "ing" words can also be adjectives and adverbs. When they are adjectives and adverbs they are actually participles. So it's very important to recognize them and know how to use them. So what I want to do first is I want to look at the adjective participles. Now, what you have to remember about adjective participles, they are... They are reduced adjective clauses. You know an adjective clause, it's meant to modify a noun. It identifies it or gives extra information about a noun. A participle, an adjective participle is that adjective clause minus the subject and the verb. Okay? But we're going to look at that in a second. So let's look at this sentence first. Oh, sorry, let me... I made a little mistake here. "Dressed in his class-A uniform, the marine looked like a recruitment poster." So this is the passive or the past participle ending in "ed", it's a regular verb, so: "dressed". "Dressed in his class-A uniform". Now, if I rearrange the sentence, really, it says: "The marine, who was dressed in his class-A uniform, looked like a recruitment poster." Okay? Like a poster that wants people to join the marines, etc. But I can take that adjective clause, I get rid of the "who was" or "who is", depending on the tense. Get rid of that, and I'm left with a participle phrase. Now, I can take that participle phrase and move it to the beginning of the sentence, just like I have here. The key when you're using participles at the beginning... A participle phrase at the beginning of a sentence, you must make sure that the subject, which is not there but it is understood: who was, who is the marine, so the marine who was dressed in his class-A, and then the subject of the independent clause must be the same subject. Okay? We're going to look at a couple more examples. "Standing near the window, Marie could see the entire village." Look at the other example: "Standing near the window, the entire village was in view." Now, many people will look at both sentences and think: "Yeah, okay, I understand them. They're both correct." This sentence is incorrect. Why? Because the subject here is "the village". Can the village stand near the window? No, it can't. So: "Standing near the window" means Marie. "Marie, who was standing near the window, could see the entire village." This subject cannot do this action, so you have to make sure that the implied or the understood subject in the participle is the exact same as the subject of the independent clause that follows it. Okay? That's very, very important. So now what we're going to do, I'm going to look at a few more examples and I want to show you that you can start the sentence with a participle phrase, but you can also leave it in the middle of the sentence. Okay? Let's look at that. Okay, let's look at these examples now and you'll see the different positions the participles can take. And again, we're talking about participle phrases for the most part. "The jazz musician, known for his tendency to daydream, got into a zone and played for an hour straight." Okay? So what we're doing here, we're giving you a little bit more information about the musician. We're not identifying him. We're giving you extra information, which is why we have the commas.
English Grammar - Inversion: "Had I known...", "Should you need..."
 
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http://www.engvid.com Should you need help understanding why the subject in this sentence comes after the verb, I can show you. In this English grammar lesson, we will look at sentences in which the subject and verb order is inverted, and the particular situations in which to use them. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-inversion/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about inversion. Now, what does "inversion" mean? "Inversion" is when you change the order of something. Right? So we're looking at grammar. Usually, you know in a sentence a subject comes first and then a verb. Today we're going to look at situations where that is reversed. Now, of course, I'm sure that you know that in questions: "Are you sure?" the verb comes before the subject in all questions. That's what makes a question structure a question structure. However, there are other situations where we have this inversion, but we're looking at a sentence; we're not looking at a question. Now, the thing to understand about inversions is that they are very particular. There are only a few expressions that you're going to use inversion with. You can't put them in just about... In just any sentence that you want. The examples that I've written on the board are the ones that you might read or that you might want to write. There are other situations that use this, but unless you're writing poetry or artistic, creative novels - you don't need them and you don't really need to worry about them either. They're very rare. It's very rare you'll see them. It's very, very formal language style. And you'll recognize them, hopefully, when you do see them. So let's start here. When we have "not only". Generally speaking, when we have a sentence that begins with a negative, we're going to have inversion, but especially when you have "not only", you're going to have inversion. Okay? "Not only did he", so there's your verb, there's your subject, there's your verb. Okay? We have the helping verb, the auxiliary verb to start. "Not only did he win", and then we have the "but", "also" to go with "not only". This is like an expression that's fixed; you're always going to be looking at the same thing. "Not only did he win, but he also broke the record." Whatever. "Not only", inversion, "but also". "Under no circumstances", this is another expression that you'll see regularly. And again, we're looking at the negative construction which is why we're looking at the inversion. "Under no circumstances should you call her/call him." Okay? Whatever you do, don't call. "Under no circumstances". "Circumstances", basically situation. In no situation should you call. In no situation, same idea. Okay? Another negative: "nor". What is "nor"? Is the negative of "or". Okay? "Or", "nor". Again, many people don't use this word anymore; it's a little bit old-fashioned, a little bit high formality level. But... "The mayor of Toronto refused to resign, nor do we expect him to." Okay? So after "nor", we still have the inversion. Verb, subject, verb. Verb, subject. Okay? I'm not sure if you know the mayor of Toronto, he's very famous now. We're not very proud, but that's a whole other story. Next, so these are the three negatives. These two are also very similar. Again, very formal style, but you might see it, you might want to use it in your essays or whatever. "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." What does this mean? "Should you need", if you need. "Should" is just a more formal way to say: "if". "If you need any help, don't hesitate to call.", "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." Now, this is a verb, subject, verb. If we use: "if", then there's no issue. Then you have "if" which is a conjunction, adverb, clause, conjunction, subject, verb. "Should" makes it verb, subject, verb. "Had" is the same thing with the "if", but a different structure of the conditional, a different "if" structure. "Had I known you were coming, I would have changed." "If I had known", "If I had known you were coming", "Had I known", it's basically you're making the sentence a little bit shorter, a little more formal. You're starting with a verb, a subject, and another verb. Okay? Past perfect, of course. So these are the conditionals, these are the no's. Now, we have the comparatives, when you're comparing something. When you're comparing an action, so you're using the clause marker: "as", not the preposition: "like". So: "John speaks Chinese, as does Lucy." Okay? "Lucy" is actually the subject, here's the verb, here's a subject. Now, I could put a period and put a new sentence. "So does Lucy." Same idea. "Lucy does as well." If I want the subject, verb order. But when you start with "as", you're going to invert the order. This is a clause marker, adverb clause marker to compare.
Grammar Girl #689. Writing About Amounts
 
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More or most? Majority or plurality? The many (how many?) ways to describe amounts. LINKS AND SPONSORS | Door Dash: Download the app and use the code GRAMMAR for $5 off. | Graduation Sweepstakes: http://bit.ly/qdtlifeaftercollege | Grammar Girl's AP style webinar: http://bit.ly/GrammarWebinar2019 | GRAMMAR POP iOS GAME | Optimized for iPad: http://bit.ly/iPadGrammarPop | For iPad and iPhone: http://bit.ly/GrammarPopMobile | GRAMMAR GIRL BOOKS | http://bit.ly/GrammarPopBooks | GRAMMAR GIRL IS PART OF THE QUICK AND DIRTY TIPS PODCAST NETWORK | VOICEMAIL: 833-214-GIRL
Views: 155 Grammar Girl
Writing Skills: The Paragraph
 
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The paragraph is the most important unit of a well-written essay. The paragraph has a specific structure and standards that make it effective and enjoyable to read. In this writing lesson we will look at how to construct good paragraphs and improve writing with better flow and clarity. After the lesson, take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/writing-skills-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about the paragraph. It's a writing lesson, and I want to show people what a paragraph is and how to construct one, what to do, what not to do so you can write very clear, very tight paragraphs. This is especially important for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students but everybody has to follow the exact same rules. Now before I even begin, I must say that I'm talking mostly about academic writing or even business writing. Creative writing like novels or short stories, anything fiction, you can do anything you want. Only always remember: somebody has to read what you wrote so it has to be clear. But academic essays, for example, certain rules you have to follow; you have to be very careful about them. So let's begin. In terms of like the actual way a paragraph looks: you have to indent or skip a line. So let me just make sure you understand what an indent is. This is an indent, the first line a little bit pushed in or you can make sure you skip a line between paragraphs. But don't do both. If you skip a line, don't indent. Okay? That's the main thing. Now, that's in terms of the way it looks. In terms of content -- and this, I can't stress this enough -- very, very, very important: one central idea in one paragraph. Okay? I've seen many people, I've seen many essays where you start a paragraph talking about one thing, and then you go off on a tangent and talk about something completely unrelated. So for example: if you start a paragraph and you're talking about apples, continue to talk about apples. If you go to oranges, that's maybe okay because you're still talking about fruit. But if you start with apples, go to oranges, go to bananas, and then end up with monkeys in space there's a bit of a problem; the reader has no idea what you're talking about. One paragraph, one central idea. Now, make sure that you tell the reader what this central idea is. This is your thesis statement. Okay? It's a very general sentence. All it does is introduce the topic of the paragraph, nothing else. All the details comes after. So speaking of details, we'll talk about details in detail, but all other ideas, all the other sentences, all your sentences with the details must directly relate back to the main idea. So let's say here is your thesis statement; very general, every sentence after must relate back to that thesis statement. Okay? You can't go off to another idea. Everything must support this, must talk about the same topic. Very important. Okay? How long should your paragraph be? Technically, a paragraph could be one sentence, but in an academic essay that rarely happens. But it could be any length you want, as long as you're still on that one topic, as long as you still have things to write and things to say about that topic, say it. If you have four sentences, fine; if you have 10 sentences, also okay. Again, for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students: four, five sentences should be your limit. You can't be too long because you don't have time and you're going to start making mistakes. So now, the details. Very important to have lots of details. Why is this topic important to your overall idea of your essay? Not only tell me what is the topic, what is the thesis statement of the paragraph, make sure you explain to me why this is important to the general idea of the essay. Give me your reasons. Now, why is it important? And then reasons, why you think what you're saying supports this idea. Examples, always use examples because giving me the reasons is okay; examples make me see exactly what you're trying to say. Very easy for me to understand what you're trying to say. Now, in terms of flow, in terms of the way the reader can approach the paragraph, you have to have bridges. What is, what do bridges mean? Basically, when you have one idea in this sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence. Every sentence must have a link to the next sentence. This creates flow, makes it much easier to read and understand, and it keeps you on the one topic. Now, key terms. If you're talking about something specific and you have to use a key term, use it as many times as you need to. Otherwise, avoid repetition. Try not to use the same word more than once in one paragraph. Okay? For example: if you're using the word "moreover" in the paragraph, don't use it, don't use "moreover" again -- use "in addition to", use "furthermore", "another", etc. Try to avoid using one word more than once, especially in the same paragraph.
Grammarly Tutorial 2018: Easily Check Grammar with Grammarly
 
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Are you looking for a reliable online text checker? Or, would you like to find out how to check for grammar errors in Word beyond the basic spelling and grammar checker? Then, you’ll want to hear more about how to check for grammar mistakes with the best free online grammar checker, Grammarly. Not too long ago, I posted my candid thoughts in a review of Grammarly and briefly covered the pros and cons of the grammar checker. But, I didn’t go in-depth about the grammar checker app nor cover the Grammarly features including the huge reason why you’d want to invest more in the Grammarly premium features. In this tutorial for Grammarly, you’ll discover more about: • The difference between the free version of Grammarly and Grammarly premium • How to have Grammarly check according to your writing style • How to use Grammarly Premium to its full potential • How to download and install Grammarly for Word • How to use Grammarly in Word • How to install Grammarly on Chrome and how to use Grammarly on Chrome • And, so much more! To get your hands on the best free grammar checker software, Grammarly, head over to our affiliate link at http://SelfPublishingWithDale.com/Grammarly Catch the full Grammarly Review: How Good Is it and Is it Worth the Money? https://youtu.be/3Tg8kA_YdHc Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/selfpublishingwithdalelroberts Share this video: https://youtu.be/MZRFnmgYTJw -------------------------------------------- Plan Your Next Book Launch Like a Pro! Get the Best Seller Book Launch Checklist at: http://SelfPublishingWithDale.com/Checklist -------------------------------------------- Learn How to Master DIY Publishing! NEW VIDEOS: Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday Subscribe and join me! https://www.youtube.com/selfpublishingwithdalelroberts ----- *Most outbound product links financially benefit the channel through affiliate programs. Affiliate links greatly help support the cause so we can continue to deliver quality videos on a consistent basis. All support is appreciated. Thank you! ** All video and audio content created by myself and or used with permission from the creator. If you're tired of trying to piece meal content together just to barely understand self-publishing... If you want to level up your knowledge and skills in self-publishing... If you would like to learn from an experienced professional who has made a living at self-publishing... Then, the DIY Publishing Course is for you! Get unlimited access or the monthly membership access at http://DIYPublishing.biz
Alliteration, Assonance, and Onomatopoeia | Style | Grammar
 
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This video will teach you all about the different ways you can use the sound of words for effect. Alliteration is when you use a bunch of similar consonants in a row; assonance is when you use a bunch of similar vowel sounds in a row; onomatopoeia is basically sound effects. You'll see.
Views: 59060 Khan Academy
5 Signs Your IELTS Writing Style is WRONG
 
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Are you losing marks in IELTS Writing because your writing style is inappropriate? Learn five typical mistakes of IELTS students and how to correct them. ☟click to show more☟ ✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ »WATCH MORE« 30 words you must avoid in IELTS Writing - https://youtu.be/7xjhWTLWC8o How to improve your writing skills immediately - https://youtu.be/-3wsKYQO_ck ✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ »MATERIALS FOR IELTS EXAM PREPARATION« ✦ ✧✦ Vocabulary for Task 1✦ ✧✦ Buy “Must-Know WORDS & PHRASES for IELTS Academic Writing Task 1” to widen your vocabulary and learn useful sentence structures for Band 7+ essays http://bit.ly/Full_Vocabulary Download free preview PDF - http://bit.ly/Free_IELTS_Vocabulary ✦ ✧✦ Vocabulary for Task 2✦ ✧✦ 4 ways to avoid word repetition + PDF https://youtu.be/pw2bCLn_7Xk 30 Band 8+ Words and Phrases for Task 2 + PDF https://youtu.be/DCASVbryqBQ Useful Phrases for Task 2 https://youtu.be/Ur07MucKPno ✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ ✧✦ » STAY CONNECTED « Subscribe to my emails and get more tips on how to pass your IELTS exam quickly - https://fastrackedu.co.uk/ielts-newsletter/ Check out my IELTS preparation online courses - http://bit.ly/ielts-preparation-courses
Views: 29747 Fastrack Education
Essay Writing Guide: Grammar and Punctuation
 
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School Project _ Video Rubric ENC 1102 _ Dr. Donnelly
Views: 9839 chinesegirl0301
Writing - Transitions - THEREFORE, THUS, CONSEQUENTLY
 
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http://www.engvid.com Learn how to use "therefore" and "thus" to show you have reached a conclusion. These transitions will improve your writing by helping you link ideas. In this lesson, we will look at transitions of conclusion and consequence to help ideas flow and improve our writing styles. I'll also teach you how you can use words like "so", "then", "hence", and "as a result" for the same purpose. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-transitions-therefore-thus-consequently/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi, again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is -- actually, I had a few requests for it. So I'm not going to mention names right now because there are too many to mention. But some people asked me about transitions, again, specifically, "therefore" and "thus". But I figured I would do the whole package because they can all work together. If you're writing essays, you can use more than one of these, more than two of these, especially for longer essays. So first, we're going to look at the differences or similarities -- as the case may be -- of these words and when and how they are used. Okay? So the words we're looking at today are "therefore", "thus", "consequently", "so", "then, "hence", and the expression "as a result". Okay? So again, all of these are transitions. I'll put it here. So a little review. What is a transition? A transition is like a bridge that connects two ideas. Okay? So what are we connecting here? What are the ideas that we want to connect? We want to connect a logical conclusion. Okay? Or we want to connect a consequence. What is a "consequence"? A consequence is, basically, a result. So for example, in life, we make choices, we make decisions, and then, we have to live with the consequences, whatever those choices bring us. Okay? So there's a very, very slight difference in these three words, especially. These are the three that I want you to use most on essays if you're going to be writing essays. Okay? We use "therefore" -- again, it's more of a mathematical word, but we use it, obviously, to write, as well. When we have a premise, from there premise, we generally reach a conclusion. Now, what is a "premise"? A "premise" is an idea that we believe to be true. And because we believe it is true, from that truth we reach a conclusion. Okay? I think everybody knows a very famous "premise + conclusion" sentence. "I think" -- premise -- "I believe that I think, therefore I am." That's the conclusion I reach. Because I think, I am. Okay. Don't be confused. It's not "because". Premise and conclusion, but I'm just trying to simplify it a little bit. "Thus" means "result". Now, it's a little bit different from "consequence". "Result" means a result of the last argument. Okay? And "consequence" is -- again, it's a result, but a consequence. Something's going to happen as a result of the thing before. Now, it's very, very important to remember, something had to be mentioned before you can use any of these words. Okay? All of these words and whatever sentence or clause or whatever comes after it is in relation to what came before. Okay? I said something before; this is my conclusion now. Or this is the result of what happened or this is the consequence. More informally, we can use "so" also to talk about a consequence or a result. We use "then". So, "This happened. Then, I did this." Not "then" like time, like sequence. "Then" means more like, "This happened, so I did this." "This happened. Then, I did that as a result of the first thing." Now, a lot of people ask me about this word, "hence". The first thing I will say is don't use it. One, it's a bit old-fashioned and a bit snobby. And two, most people don't use it correctly anyway. I personally don't like this word, but if you must use it, then, remember it's also like a consequence. Use it instead of "thus" -- probably instead of "therefore". And of course, very casual, "as a result". Okay? So before we look at this -- all of these individually, let's look at some examples. "I am cold." Okay? This is the situation. "I am cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat." [Coughs] Excuse me. Actually, you know what? Let me change this. Sorry. I'll put a period here. If I were going to use "therefore" with this, I would start a new sentence. All of these words can be used to start a sentence or mid-sentence. But some of them are better used to start. Some of them are better used in the middle. "I'm cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat."
Grammar Girl #704. Present Tense When Writing About Fiction. The Poop Emoji and Eggcorns.
 
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If you're writing about fiction, especially time-shifting fiction, it can be tricky figuring out whether to use present tense or past tense. We have help! Also, I answer a listener question about a funny mix up about the poop emoji. LINKS AND SPONSORS | Cove: http://withcove.com/gg | Grammar Girl Email Newsletter | https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/newsletters | Grammar Girl's AP style webinar | http://bit.ly/GrammarWebinar2019 | GRAMMAR POP iOS GAME | Optimized for iPad: http://bit.ly/iPadGrammarPop | For iPad and iPhone: http://bit.ly/GrammarPopMobile | GRAMMAR GIRL BOOKS | http://bit.ly/GrammarPopBooks | GRAMMAR GIRL IS PART OF THE QUICK AND DIRTY TIPS PODCAST NETWORK | VOICEMAIL: 833-214-GIRL (833-214-4475)
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