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Camp: Notes on Fashion
 
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Watch a video preview of the exhibition Camp: Notes on Fashion, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue from May 9 through September 8, 2019. Subscribe for new content from the Met: https://www.youtube.com/user/metmuseu... Learn more about this exhibition: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/camp-notes-on-fashion #art #themet #fashion #themetropolitanmuseumofart #museum #campnotesonfashion Featuring: Rupert Everett Artwork / Footage / Audio / Images courtesy of Photo © Johnny Dufort, 2019 © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY.Photo: Christophe Fouin. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana The Essex Record Office Mary Evans Picture Library © British Library Board. All Rights Reserved/Bridgeman Images © 2019 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved © 2019 by Susan Sontag, used by permission of The Wylie Agency LLC BBC Motion Gallery / Getty Images Universal Studios Licensing LLC Myrabella / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 3.0 Italnoleggio / Eichberg / Kobal / Shutterstock © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Naval Art Collection, Naval History and Heritage Command (Pam Overmann) © 2019 The Estate of Edward Steichen / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York © 2019 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 370952 The Met
Abraham Roentgen's Writing Desk
 
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Discover the secret compartments of this writing table and see how it can be transformed into a private altar. Perhaps the most exquisite and technically refined piece from German cabinetmaker Abraham Roentgen (1711--1793), this desk was made for his premier patron, the Catholic official Johann Philipp von Walderdorff. Its interior holds a multitude of drawers, panels, and compartments, in addition to sophisticated mechanical fittings that safeguard the elector's privacy. This table is from Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens More information about this object can be found here:http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/collectie/BK-16676/bureau-op-s-vormige-poten-versierd-met-marqueterie Footage courtesy of VideoART GmbH and Kunstgewerbemuseum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
Views: 535922 The Met
Rolltop Desk by David Roentgen: Demonstration
 
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The inventive talents of David Roentgen are evident in this exceptionally refined desk. The monogram DR inlaid beneath the kehole on the lower drawer indicates the cabinetmaker's satisfaction with one of his most mechanically ingenuous creations: a single key inserted at different depths unlocks the center drawer, releases the rolltop, or releases the hidden side drawers; if a button is pressed on the underside of these drawers, each swings aside to reveal three other drawers. Above the rolltop, the rectangular structure consists of a single wide drawer. His artistic creativity is evident in the chinoiserie marquetry scenes, created by using minute pieces of naturally colored exotic woods that have a painterly effect. To learn more about this desk, please visit: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/120013698 This desk is part of the The Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Editor Sarah Cowan Jib Operator Kelly Richardson Camera Wayne de la Roche Lighting Director Ned Hallick Grip Jim Purchase Production Coordinator Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants Maureen Coyle Kate Farrell Jessica Glass Wardrobe Robin Schwalb Object Demonstration Wolfram Koeppe Additional contributions from Staci Hou Wolfram Koeppe Paco Link Tamara Schechter Eileen Willis A production of the Digital Media Department © 2012 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 247497 The Met
Conserving Degas
 
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Watch a video about the construction of a new tutu for The Met's cast of Degas's famous sculpture, The Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer. The Met's costume conservator Glenn Peterson discusses the history of the sculpture and the decisions made in the conservation of its tutu. The sculpture, usually on view at The Met Fifth Avenue, is currently featured in the exhibition Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now), on view at The Met Breuer through July 22, 2018. Featured Artwork: Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917). The Little Fourteen-Year-Old Dancer, model executed ca. 1880, cast 1922. French, Paris. Cast by A. A. Hébrard. Bronze, partially tinted, with cotton skirt and satin hair ribbon; wood base; 38 1/2 x 17 1/4 x 14 3/8 in. (97.8 x 43.8 x 36.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.370) https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/196439 Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) is on view at The Met Breuer from March 21 through July 22, 2018. https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2018/like-life Credits This conservation project was made possible by Monika A. McLennan and children. Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Sarah Cowan Camera: Wayne De La Roche, Dia Felix, Sarah Cowan, and Stephanie Wuertz Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistant: Bryan Martin Original Music: Austin Fisher © 2018 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 292794 The Met
Conserving Michelangelo
 
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Watch a video showing the conservation of a Michelangelo drawing on loan from Christ Church Picture Gallery, Oxford, in preparation for the exhibition Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer. The Met's paper conservator Marjorie Shelley takes us through the complex and delicate process of restoring this beautiful architectural drawing. https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2017/michelangelo Featured Artwork: Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564 ). Designs for a monumental altar or facade, possibly for San Silvestro in Capite, Rome. Pen and brown ink, brush and brown wash, black chalk, stylus ruling, and compass construction (recto), black chalk, some ruling in black chalk (verso). By permission of the Governing Body of Christ Church, Oxford (0992; JBS 64) Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer is on view at The Met Fifth Avenue from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018. #MetMichelangelo Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. Director: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Producer: Melissa Bell Camera: Wayne de la Roche, Sarah Cowan, Dia Felix Lighting: Dia Felix Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistants: Bryan Martin, Stephanie Wuertz Original Music: Austin Fisher © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 1151750 The Met
Unfolding an 18th-century Game Table
 
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This finely crafted piece of furniture has a secret. Swing out a leg, adjust an arm, and voilà! Leaves unfold to reveal multiple configurations: a felt surface for card games, a game board for chess or checkers, a desk with a leather writing surface and book rest. Tug at a hidden latch, and a spring-driven backgammon board pops up. The brainchild of German cabinetmaker David Roentgen (1743--1807), this sophisticated game table once graced the intimate interior of an aristocratic European home. The exquisite piece was not only convenient for entertaining guests, but it was also portable—its legs unscrew so it can easily be packed and moved. This 3-D animation of the table demonstrates its different configurations and illuminates its concealed features, including drawers for tucking away personal items and compartments for storing game pieces. To learn more about the Game Table, please visit: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/120050102 This table is part of the The Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens
Views: 213117 The Met
“Gurbet O Kadar” by Yildirim Gürses
 
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“Gurbet O Kadar” by Yildirim Gürses, performed by Ara Dinkjian on the ūd, Tamer Pinarbasi on the qānūn, and Glen Velez on the bodhrán. Filmed in the The Koç Family Galleries featuring Carpets, Textiles and the Greater Ottoman World and Arts of the Ottoman Court (14th–20th centuries), on August 1, 2018. Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation. Credits: Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Alex Guns Camera: Alex Guns and Kelly Richardson Lighting: Ned Hallick Gaffer: Christopher Yurnet Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio: David Raymond Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistants: Stephanie Wuertz, Sarah Cowan Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments Jayson Kerr Dobney, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator J. Kenneth Moore, Curator Emeritus Tim Caster, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator © 2018 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 211889 The Met
The Roentgens' Berlin Secretary Cabinet
 
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Discover the hidden features and intricate interior of this cabinet. One of the finest achievements of European furniture making, this cabinet is the most important product from Abraham (1711--1793) and David Roentgen's (1743--1807) workshop. A writing cabinet crowned with a chiming clock, it features finely designed marquetry panels and elaborate mechanisms that allow for doors and drawers to be opened automatically at the touch of a button. Owned by King Frederick William II, the Berlin cabinet is uniquely remarkable for its ornate decoration, mechanical complexity, and sheer size. This cabinet is from Kunstgewerbemuseum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens Footage courtesy of VideoART GmbH and Kunstgewerbemuseum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
Views: 14606710 The Met
"Lachrimae" by John Dowland
 
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Christopher Morrongiello performs "Lachrimae" (ca. 1590s) by John Dowland (1563–1626), Cambridge University Library manuscript DD.2.11. Filmed in the Chapel from Le Château de la Bastie d'Urfé at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Featured Instrument: Attributed to Wendelin Tieffenbrucker (German, active 1570–1610). Lute, late 16th century. Padua, Italy. Yew, spruce, ebony, maple. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Freedman, by exchange, 1989 (1989.13) http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/503357 Recorded April 15, 2015 Credits Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation. A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Kate Farrell Camera: Kate Farrell and Kelly Richardson Lighting: Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio: David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Associate Conservator Tim Caster, Principal Departmental Technician Marian Eines, Associate for Administration Pamela Summey, Assistant for Administration
Views: 498221 The Met
MetCollects—Episode 6 / 2015: Michael Gallagher on "Everhard Jabach and His Family"
 
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"What does it take to revive a masterwork?" Michael Gallagher on conserving Charles Le Brun's Everhard Jabach and His Family Charles Le Brun (French, 1619–1690). Everhard Jabach (1618–1695) and His Family, ca. 1660. Oil on canvas; 110 1/4 x 129 1/8 in. (280 x 328 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Keith Christiansen, 2014 (2014.250) http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/626692 MetCollects introduces highlights of works of art recently acquired by the Met through gifts and purchases. Discover a new work each month. http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/metcollects Credits Director: Christopher Noey Producer and Editor: Kate Farrell Camera: Sarah Cowan, Kate Farrell, Lisa Rifkind Design: Natasha Mileshina Music: Austin Fisher Explore more on MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video
Views: 292192 The Met
Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty - Gallery Views 2011
 
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Learn more about Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty on view at the Met May 4--July 31, 2011: http://blog.metmuseum.org/alexandermcqueen/ The exhibition, organized by The Costume Institute, celebrates the late Alexander McQueen's extraordinary contributions to fashion. From his Central Saint Martins postgraduate collection of 1992 to his final runway presentation, which took place after his death in February 2010, Mr. McQueen challenged and expanded the understanding of fashion beyond utility to a conceptual expression of culture, politics, and identity. His iconic designs constitute the work of an artist whose medium of expression was fashion. The exhibition will feature approximately one hundred ensembles and seventy accessories from Mr. McQueen's prolific nineteen-year career. Drawn primarily from the Alexander McQueen Archive in London, with some pieces from the Givenchy Archive in Paris as well as private collections, signature designs including the "bumster" trouser, the kimono jacket, and the three-point "origami" frock coat will be on view. McQueen's fashions often referenced the exaggerated silhouettes of the 1860s, 1880s, 1890s, and 1950s, but his technical ingenuity always imbued his designs with an innovative sensibility that kept him at the vanguard. Producer/Director Christopher Noey Editor Kate Farrell Audio Editor Stephanie Wuertz Camera Jessica Glass Lighting Director Ned Hallick Production Assistant Sarah Cowan
Views: 178474 The Met
After the Fall: The Conservation of Tullio Lombardo's "Adam"
 
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Conservators, scientists, and curators tell the story behind the unprecedented conservation of Tullio Lombardo's "Adam." For more information, including production credits, view this video on MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video/collections/esda/after-the-fall
Views: 191593 The Met
Camp: Notes on Fashion Gallery Views | Met Fashion
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2019 exhibition, Camp: Notes on Fashion, narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. Through more than 250 objects dating from the seventeenth century to the present, The Costume Institute's spring 2019 exhibition explores the origins of camp's exuberant aesthetic. Susan Sontag's 1964 essay "Notes on 'Camp'" provides the framework for the exhibition, which examines how the elements of irony, humor, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration are expressed in fashion. Subscription/Exhibition/Other Links: Subscribe for new content from the Met: https://www.youtube.com/user/metmuseu... Learn more about this exhibition: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/camp-notes-on-fashion #fashion #MetCamp #art #themet #themetropolitanmuseumofart #museum © 2019 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 149924 The Met
#MetKids—Weave on a Mini Loom
 
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Follow along and learn how to weave yarn on a mini cardboard loom. Materials: • cardboard • ruler • pencil • scissors • yarn • tape • needle (a large plastic embroidery needle works well) Instructions: Make Your Loom 1. Measure and mark two borders that are 1/2 inch (1.5 cm) from the top and bottom of a small rectangular piece of cardboard. 2. Along the top border, mark lines down from the top edge of the cardboard that are spaced evenly apart (1/4 inch, or .6 cm, if you want them close together; 1/2 inch, or 1.5 cm, if you want them farther apart). Mark an even number of lines (6, 8, 10, etc.). 3. Repeat along the bottom border, making sure you space the lines in the same way. 4. Cut a slit from the border to the edge along each line you marked. Thread Your Loom 1. Tape the yarn on the back of the loom, under the first slit. 2. Turn your loom to the front and thread the yarn through the first slit at the top, then the first slit at the bottom. 3. Turn your loom to the back and thread the yarn through the next slit at the top. 4. Turn your loom to the front and thread the yarn through the second slit at the bottom. 5. Continue to thread the yarn like this through the rest of the slits. 6. When you've finished, cut the yarn and tape the loose end on the back. 7. This lengthwise, up-and-down thread is called the warp. Weave 1. Thread the yarn through the needle. It might be helpful to tie it to the needle. 2. This horizontal, left-to-right, right-to-left yarn is called the weft. 3. On the front of the loom, start weaving the weft under the first warp on the left and over the second warp, then under and over until you reach the right end. 4. Pull the weft yarn all the way through, but leave a tail (about 3 inches, or 7.5 cm) on the left side. 5. Loop the needle under the last warp on the right, so it catches. Then weave it over and under all the way to the left side. Pull the weft yarn all the way through, but not so tight that you pull the warp threads together. 6. Push the second row of weft tightly against the first. 7. Continue to weave the weft back and forth, under and over the warp, and push each row of weft tightly against the rest. 8. When you'd like to change colors, cut the weft yarn, leaving a tail (about 3 inches, or 7.5 cm). 9. Begin the new weft color where you left off and continue to weave. 10. Add as many colors as you like. 11. Once you fill the loom, cut the last row of weft yarn, leaving a tail (about 3 inches, or 7.5 cm). 12. Thread the loose tails into the looped ends of the weft and cut any extra yarn that sticks out. Remove Your Weaving 1. On the back of the loom, remove the tape from the ends and cut the warp in the middle. 2. Turn the loom to the front and pull two adjacent warp yarns from the slits and knot them together. 3. Repeat with each pair of warp yarns to remove the weaving from the cardboard loom. Credits #MetKids is a digital feature made for, with, and by kids! http://www.metmuseum.org/art/online-features/metkids/credits About #MetKids http://www.metmuseum.org/art/online-features/metkids/about Inspired by The 'Simonetti' Carpet and Diana and Actaeon from a set of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Closed captioning for this video is available in ten additional languages: #MetKids–نسج على منوال صغير #MetKids—在小编织板上编织 #MetKids—Faire du tissage sur un mini-métier à tisser #MetKids—Flechte auf einem Mini-Webstuhl #MetKids—Tessere ad un Mini-Telaio メットキッズ—ミニ織機で織る #MetKids—작은 베틀로 천 짜기 #MetKids—Costure em um mini tear #MetKids — Как плести на станке #MetKids—Tejiendo en un mini telar Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 53430 The Met
Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between
 
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Andrew Bolton, Curator in Charge of the Costume Institute discusses the exhibition "Rei Kawakubo/Comme de Garçons: Art of the In-Between," on view at The Met Fifth Avenue May 4–September 4, 2017. #MetKawakubo The Costume Institute's spring 2017 exhibition will examine the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show will feature approximately 150 examples of Kawakubo's womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection. The exhibition is made possible in part by Condé Nast Production credits Director and Producer: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Camera: Alex Rappoport, Sarah Cowan, Dia Felix Interviewer: Christopher Noey Lighting: Ned Hallick Gaffer: Foster McLaughlin Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Production Assistant: Kaelan Burkett Original Music: Austin Fisher Special thanks to: Nicholas Alan Cope, Ari Marcopoulos, Brigitte Niedermair, Collier Schorr In order of appearance: This video is provided courtesy of the Merce Cunningham Trust. © All rights reserved. Photograph by © Katerina Jebb Photograph by © Paolo Roversi Photograph by © Kazumi Kurigami Photograph by © Craig McDean Photograph by © Collier Schorr Photograph by © Peter Lindbergh Photograph by © Nicholas Alan Cope Photograph by © Brigitte Niedermair Photograph by © Ari Marcopoulos © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 25626 The Met
Digital Reconstruction of the Northwest Palace, Nimrud, Assyria
 
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This video reconstructs the Nortwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud (near modern Mosul in northern Iraq) as it would have appeared during his reign in the ninth century B.C. The video moves from the outer courtyards of the palace into the throne room and beyond into more private spaces, perhaps used for rituals. The video also shows the original location and painted colors of the relief depicting the winged, eagle-headed figure included in the exhibition Assyria to Iberia at the Dawn of the Classical Age (on view September 22, 2014–January 4, 2015). For production credits and exhibition information—including sponsorship credits—visit MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video/collections/ancient-near-eastern-art/northwest-palace-nimrud
Views: 118766 The Met
An Art of Attraction: The Electrotyping Process
 
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Ellenor Alcorn, associate curator in the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, explains the nineteenth-century process of electrotyping and how it was used to create presentation copies of Tiffany and Company's famous silver Bryant Vase. Related exhibition: Victorian Electrotypes: Old Treasures, New Technology On view November 22, 2011, through April 22, 2012 Transcript: Ellenor Alcorn: The Bryant Vase was completed in 1876 by a team of skilled artists working for Tiffany and Company. They worked for more than a year meticulously chasing the sterling silver. Tiffany made a second vase for presentation using the electrotyping process. To make an electrotype, molds are taken of each section of the vase. A flexible molding material is applied to the surface —in this case, gutta percha, the sap of an East Indian tree. The mold hardens, leaving a precise impression. A coating of graphite makes the interior of the mold electrically conductive. Wires are attached to the inner surface. The mold is suspended in a copper-sulfite bath with a piece of copper and an electrical charge is applied. The negatively charged graphite attracts the positively charged copper ions, eventually building up to form a thick copper wall. When the copper is thick enough, the mold is removed from the bath. The copper form is separated from the mold. Additional copies can be made using this first example as a master pattern. The edges are trimmed and filed. The sections are soldered together. Then the copper is plated with silver, by immersing it in a bath of silver cyanide with a piece of silver. When the electrical charge is applied, a layer of silver is deposited on the surface. In order to perfectly match the original, the copy is oxidized. On the surface, the two vases seem to be identical in every minute detail, though the copper vase was made in much less time. Electrotyping had far-reaching uses, in the duplication of works of art, in manufacturing, and in the printing industry. This technology was one of many radical innovations made possible by the growth of electrical science.
Views: 23318 The Met
"Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology"—Gallery Views
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2016 exhibition, Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The Costume Institute's spring 2016 exhibition, presented in the Museum's Robert Lehman Wing, explores how fashion designers are reconciling the handmade and the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and avant-garde ready-to-wear. #ManusxMachina Video Footage Excerpt from ONE LOOK (2015), presented by VisionaireFILM, directed by Stylianos Pangalos, produced by Cecilia Dean and James Kaliardos Excerpt from Making of the CHANEL Fall-Winter 2015/16 Haute Couture Collection, © CHANEL Excerpt from A new design by Iris Van Herpen, © Centraal Museum Utrecht/Wendy van Wilgenburg. Special thanks to Iris van Herpen and Materialise. Production Credits Director: Christopher Noey Producer: Kate Farrell Video Editor: Stephanie Wuertz Jib and Camera Operator: Kelly Richardson Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Production Assistants: Dia Felix, Sarah Cowan © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 73208 The Met
David Roentgen's Automaton of Queen Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player (La Joueuse de Tympanon)
 
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Watch this surprising video of an automaton play the dulcimer. David Roentgen (1743--1807) took his royal patron by surprise when he delivered this beautiful automaton to King Louis XVI for his queen, Marie Antoinette, in 1784. The cabinetry for this piece is very much a neoclassical masterwork, and the mechanism behind it is truly extraordinary: the figure strikes the strings in perfect rhythm with two small metal hammers held in her hands, which move with great precision. This object is from Musée des arts et métiers de Paris and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: View the full video here: http://www.cerimes.fr/le-catalogue/la-joueuse-de-tympanon.html Footage courtesy of CERIMES.
Views: 120410 The Met
Sun Xun: Special Printmaking Demonstration in The Astor Court
 
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Sun Xun demonstrates his woodcarving process in relation to his video practice. View a related interview about his work "Some Actions Which Haven't Been Defined Yet in The Revolution" (2011), an animation video featured in the 2013 exhibition "Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China": http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video/collections/asian/sun-xun-ink-art Credits Producers: Maxwell K. Hearn and Chris Noey Videographers: Lisa Rifkind and Thomas Ling Interviewer: Xin Wang Editor: Ara Yun Qiu © 2015 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 50988 The Met
2019 Met Gala Red Carpet Arrivals
 
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See highlights from the red carpet at the 2019 Costume Institute Benefit, held May 6, 2019. This year's event celebrates the opening of the exhibition Camp: Notes on Fashion. Subscribe for new content from the Met: https://www.youtube.com/user/metmuseu... Learn more about this exhibition: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/camp-notes-on-fashion #metgala #celebrities #metcamp #fashion #art #themet #themetropolitanmuseumofart #museum #metgala2019
Views: 243076 The Met
Conserving the Damascus Room at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
 
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The Damascus Room (1707) served as the reception area within a Syrian home of the Ottoman period. Extensive conservation and historical research were carried out by the Metropolitan Museum in preparation for the opening of the new galleries. Open November 1, 2011 Producer Christopher Noey Editor Jessica Glass Camera Jessica Glass Stephanie Wuertz Sound Robin Schwalb David Raymond Production Assistant Sarah Cowan
Views: 113921 The Met
The Artist Project: John Baldessari
 
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John Baldessari on Philip Guston's "Stationary Figure" "I think it's brilliant: making art look like it's not about skill." The Artist Project is an online series in which artists respond to works of art in The Met’s encyclopedic collection. Now available as a book published by Phaidon in cooperation with The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Purchase a copy: http://store.metmuseum.org/art-history+reference/the-artist-project-what-artists-see-when-they-look-at-art/invt/80037399 http://www.metmuseum.org/ArtistProject/john-baldessari
Views: 23712 The Met
Conserving the Emperor's Carpet
 
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The magnificent sixteenth-century Emperor's Carpet from Safavid Iran was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum in 1941, but its condition was so fragile that it was only displayed for public twice over the next sixty years. This video documents the ambitious three-year conservation program that was launched in 2006 to stabilize the condition of the carpet so its lustrous wools and dazzling colors can be displayed the Museum on a regular basis. Featured speakers: Sheila Canby, Florica Zaharia, Midori Sato, Yael Rosenfeld, Janina Poskrobko The Emperor’s Carpet; second half 16th century; silk (warp and weft), wool (pile; asymmetrically pile; Rug: L. 299 in. (759.5 cm), W. 133 1/2 in. (339.1 cm), Wt. on a 10" tube: 144 lbs. (65.3 kg) Learn more about this artwork: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/140007803 © 2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art #TheMet #art #museum #history #NewYork #Islamic #carpet #conservation Subscribe to see weekly videos: https://goo.gl/QgCKTC
Views: 378629 The Met
Demonstration of David Roentgen's Automaton of Queen Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player
 
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Watch a demonstration of Queen Marie Antoinette's Automaton playing one of eight melodies it can perform. David Roentgen (1743--1807) took his royal patron by surprise when he delivered this beautiful automaton to King Louis XVI for his queen, Marie Antoinette, in 1784. The cabinetry for this piece is very much a neoclassical masterwork, and the mechanism behind it is truly extraordinary: the figure strikes the strings in perfect rhythm with two small metal hammers held in her hands, which move with great precision. This object is from Musée des arts et métiers de Paris and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: View a full documentary on this object: http://www.cerimes.fr/le-catalogue/la-joueuse-de-tympanon.html
Views: 288901 The Met
"China: Through the Looking Glass"—Gallery Views
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2015 exhibition, "China: Through the Looking Glass," narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The exhibition is made possible by Yahoo. Additional support is provided by Condé Nast and several Chinese donors. http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2015/china-through-the-looking-glass Credits Director and Producer: Christopher Noey Video Editor: Kate Farrell Audio Editor: Stephanie Wuertz Jib and Camera Operator: Kelly Richardson Second Camera: Alex Rappoport Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin, Julio Yurnet Production Assistant: Lisa Rifkind © 2015 The Metropolitan Museum of Art Artwork credit: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Mao, 1973. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas; 12 x 10 1/8 in. (30.5 x 25.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Halston, 1983 (1983.606.8). © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/677114 Explore more at MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video
Views: 68615 The Met
Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between—Gallery Views
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2017 exhibition, Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between, narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The Costume Institute's spring 2017 exhibition examines the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show features approximately 140 examples of Kawakubo's womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection. #MetKawakubo The exhibition is made possible in part by Condé Nast Director and Producer: Kate Farrell Editors: Dia Felix, Sarah Cowan Jib and Camera Operator: Kelly Richardson Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin, Christopher Yurnet Production Assistants: Kaelan Burkett, Stephanie Wuertz Music: Austin Fisher © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 39081 The Met
Jorge Caballero plays El Puerto, by Isaac Albeniz
 
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El Puerto from Book One of the Iberia Suite by Isaac Albéniz (1860--1909) played by Jorge Caballero. Filmed in the Patio from the Castle of Vélez Blanco at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, February, 2013. Performed on a guitar made by Hermann Hauser (1882--1952) in Munich, 1940. On loan from The Augustine Foundation. Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kate Farrell and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by Marlan Barry Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 66495 The Met
The Cloisters Museum and Gardens: Behind the Scenes with the Director
 
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Learn more about The Cloisters Museum & Gardens: http://www.metmuseum.org/cloisters/ Metropolitan Museum of Art Director Thomas P. Campbell explores the masterpieces, gardens, history, and architecture of The Cloisters Museum and Gardens with Peter Barnet, Curator in Charge of Medieval Art and The Cloisters. Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Jessica Glass Camera: Wayne De La Roche, Jessica Glass Sound: David Raymond Production Assistance: Kate Farrell, Sarah Cowan, Travis Kray
Views: 40181 The Met
Viola, Pietro Giovanni Mantegazza (ca.1730-1803), Milan, 1767.
 
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Viola, Pietro Giovanni Mantegazza (ca.1730-1803), Milan, 1767. La Capriceuse, Op. 17, by Edward Elgar (1857-1934). Originally for violin, arranged by David Aaron Carpenter. Performed by David Aaron Carpenter, viola, and Gabriela Martinez, piano. Viola on loan from a Private Collector. Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department, The Metropolitan Museum Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Sarah Cowan Camera by Wayne de la Roche and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Corinne Colgan, Robin Schwalb Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 27088 The Met
82nd & Fifth: "The Choice" by Walter Liedtke
 
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http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/the-choice Explore this object: http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/rembrandt-rembrandt-van-rijn-dutch-aristotle-with-a-bust-of-homer-61.198 The central problem of Western civilization is reduced to one guy who's got to puzzle it out for himself. 82nd & Fifth invites 100 curators from across the Museum to talk about 100 works of art that changed the way they see the world. iPad App available in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/82nd-fifth-from-the-met/id903909632?ls=1&mt=8
Views: 18856 The Met
Viola, Benjamin Banks (1727--1795), London, 1791.
 
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Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873--1943), originally for voice, arranged for viola by David Aaron Carpenter. Performed by David Aaron Carpenter and Gabriela Martinez, piano. Viola, Gift of Dorothy and Robert Rosenbaum, 1979 (1979.177). Learn more about this instrument: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/180015744 Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department, The Metropolitan Museum Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Sarah Cowan Camera by Wayne de la Roche and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Corinne Colgan, Robin Schwalb Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 33446 The Met
The Artist Project: George Condo
 
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George Condo on Claude Monet's "The Path through the Irises" "Something that is so sort of horrible turns into this exquisite daydream." The Artist Project is an online series in which artists respond to works of art in The Met’s encyclopedic collection. Now available as a book published by Phaidon in cooperation with The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Purchase a copy: http://store.metmuseum.org/art-history+reference/the-artist-project-what-artists-see-when-they-look-at-art/invt/80037399 http://www.metmuseum.org/ArtistProject/george-condo
Views: 11156 The Met
Cristofori Piano: Sonata K.9 by Domenico Scarlatti
 
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Dongsok Shin performs the Sonata in d minor, K.9 by Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) on the earliest known surviving piano, made by the instrument's inventor, Bartolomeo Cristofori (1655-1731), in Florence, 1720. Scarlatti's keyboard compositions were performed on both the harpsichord and the early piano. Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kelly Richardson and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator E. Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Dongsok Shin, keyboard technician Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 208074 The Met
Tabla: Theka, Qayeda, and Tukra in Tintal (Madhya Lay - Medium Tempo)
 
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Recited and played by Samir Chatterjee. Filmed in the gallery for the art of Mughal South Asia and Later South Asia at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on May13, 2013. A production of the Digital Media Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kelly Richardson and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Kate Farrell, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator P. Allen Roda, Research Fellow Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 29905 The Met
Irving Penn Centennial
 
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A preview of the exhibition Irving Penn Centennial April 24–July 30, 2017 at The Met, featuring Jeff Rosenheim, Curator in Charge, Photographs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Maria Morris Hambourg, Independent Curator and Former Curator in Charge, Photographs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. #IrvingPenn http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2017/irving-penn-centennial The most comprehensive retrospective to date of the work of the great American photographer Irving Penn (1917–2009), this exhibition will mark the centennial of the artist's birth. Over the course of his nearly 70-year career, Penn mastered a pared-down aesthetic of studio photography that is distinguished for its meticulous attention to composition, nuance, and detail. The exhibition is made possible by the Terra Foundation for American Art, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation. Terra Foundation for American Art logo It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in collaboration with The Irving Penn Foundation. The catalogue is made possible by the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, Inc.; the Mary C. and James W. Fosburgh Publications Fund; and the Roswell L. Gilpatric Publications Fund. Production Credits: Director and Producer Kate Farrell Editor Sarah Cowan Interviewer Christopher Noey Camera Wayne De La Roche, Dia Felix Jib Operator Kelly Richardson Lighting Director Ned Hallick Gaffer Foster McLaughlin Sound Recording Thomas Meyers Original Music Austin Fisher Audio Postproduction David Raymond Production Coordinator Lisa Rifkind Production Assistant Karlie Efinger Irving Penn photographs Copyright © The Irving Penn Foundation Copyright © Condé Nast Publications, Inc. 8mm film footage of Penn at work in Morocco by Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 10708 The Met
Vladimir Gorbach plays El Mestre by Miguel Llobet
 
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El Mestre by Miguel Llobet (1878--1938) played by Vladimir Gorbach. Filmed in the Patio from the Castle of Vélez Blanco at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, February, 2013. Performed on a guitar made in the workshop of José Ramírez III (1922--1995) by Mariano Tezanos Martin (born 1949) in Madrid, 1967. Ex coll.: Christopher Parkening. Learn more about this instrument at: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/180019021 Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kate Farrell and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by Marlan Barry Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 39956 The Met
Demonstration of the Roentgens' Dressing Table (Poudreuse)
 
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See a demonstration of how this desk operates. When closed, this table may not seem like one of the most complex pieces of European furniture ever made. However, once opened, its concealed drawers and hidden features are exposed, and the entire piece transforms into a dressing table, orpoudreuse. Scholars believe it was commissioned as a wedding gift from Abraham (1711--1793) and David Roentgen (1743--1807) by Friedrich August III, Elector of Saxony, to his bride in 1769. This table is from Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Frankfurt, and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens
Views: 395521 The Met
Installation of the Statue of Athena Parthenos (ca. 170 B.C.)
 
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On August 4, 2016, a monumental statue of Athena Parthenos (ca. 170 B.C.) from Pergamon was installed in The Met's Great Hall. A special loan from the collection of the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, the statue will remain on display in the Great Hall for two years. Production Credits Producer: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Camera: Sarah Cowan, Stephanie Wuertz Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Production Assistant: Kaelan Burkett Original Music: Austin Fisher © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 30485 The Met
“The Invisible Lover” by Ara Dinkjian
 
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“The Invisible Lover” by Ara Dinkjian, performed by Ara Dinkjian on the ūd, Tamer Pinarbasi on the qānūn, and Glen Velez on the riq. Filmed in the The Koç Family Galleries featuring Carpets, Textiles and the Greater Ottoman World and Arts of the Ottoman Court (14th–20th centuries), on August 1, 2018. Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation. Credits: Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Alex Guns Camera: Alex Guns and Kelly Richardson Lighting: Ned Hallick Gaffer: Christopher Yurnet Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio: David Raymond Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistants: Stephanie Wuertz, Sarah Cowan Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments Jayson Kerr Dobney, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator J. Kenneth Moore, Curator Emeritus Tim Caster, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator © 2018 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 16031 The Met
Cristofori Piano: Sonata number 6 by Lodovico Giustini
 
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Dongsok Shin performs the Giga of Sonata number 6 in B flat major by Lodovico Giustini (1685-1743) on the earliest known surviving piano, made by the instrument's inventor, Bartolomeo Cristofori (1655-1731), in Florence, 1720. This sonata is from the 12 Sonate da cimbalo di piano e forte detto volgarmente di martelletti, Op. 1, written in 1732. These are the first known pieces to have been composed specifically for the piano. Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation. A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kelly Richardson and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator E. Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Dongsok Shin, keyboard technician Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 128352 The Met
“Georgie Buck” performed by Rhiannon Giddens
 
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“Georgie Buck”, a traditional Appalachian folk song, performed on the banjo by Rhiannon Giddens. Filmed in the André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments of The Metropolitan Museum of Art on November 15, 2018. #musicalinstruments #art #themet #themetropolitanmuseumofart #museum #banjo #live #liveperformance #RhiannonGiddens Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation. Production credits: Director: Andy Biskin Camera: Mike O'Brien and Eric Mercado Editor: Alex Guns Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio: David Raymond Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments Jayson Kerr Dobney, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator J. Kenneth Moore, Curator Emeritus Tim Caster, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator © 2019 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 7549 The Met
"Sarabanda" from "Sonate d'intavolatura di leuto" by Giovanni Zamboni
 
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Christopher Morrongiello performs "Sarabanda" from "Sonate d'intavolatura di leuto" (Lucca, 1718) by Giovanni Zamboni (possibly 1664–1721). Filmed in the Chapel from Le Château de la Bastie d'Urfé at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Featured Instrument: A 2014 archlute by Ivo Magherini, modeled after: David Tecchler (Austrian, 1666–1747). Archlute, ca. 1725. Rome, Italy. Spruce, ebony, ivory, tortoiseshell, mother-of-pearl, and various other materials. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Clara Mertens Bequest, in memory of André Mertens, 1988 (1988.87) http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/503613 Recorded April 15, 2015 Credits Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation. A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Kate Farrell Camera: Kate Farrell and Kelly Richardson Lighting: Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio: David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Associate Conservator Tim Caster, Principal Departmental Technician Marian Eines, Associate for Administration Pamela Summey, Assistant for Administration
Views: 53479 The Met
Irving Penn on Location in Morocco, 1971
 
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This 8mm film footage, shot by Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn in 1971, shows Irving Penn at work in his portable studio on location in Morocco. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition "Irving Penn: Centennial," on view at The Met Fifth Avenue from April 24 through July 30, 2017. #IrvingPenn Credits Director and Producer: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Irving Penn photographs: © The Irving Penn Foundation © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 14334 The Met
The Emperor's Private Paradise: Virtual tour of Juanqinzhai
 
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The Emperor's Private Paradise: Treasures from the Forbidden City on view at the Met February 1, 2011--May 1, 2011: http://met.org/dVMPrs This loan exhibition organized by the Peabody Essex Museum presents some ninety paintings, decorative works, architectural elements, and religious works created for an elaborate two-acre private retreat built deep within the Forbidden City in 1771 as the retirement residence of one of China's most extravagant monarchs—the Qianlong Emperor (r. 1736--95)—who presided over China's last dynasty, the Qing, at the zenith of its power and wealth. No expense was spared to make this complex as sumptuous and comfortable as possible. The costliest materials, including rare woods, semiprecious stones, cloisonné, gilt bronze, porcelain, and lacquer were employed to ornament every surface of this world. In the end the emperor declined to retire here and the space remained a virtual time capsule relatively untouched since imperial times.
Views: 26175 The Met
The Met 360° Project: The Temple of Dendur
 
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Immerse yourself in this 360° video capturing dawn to dusk in the Temple of Dendur. Built around 15 B.C. when the Roman Emperor Augustus ruled Egypt, the temple was a 1968 gift from Egypt to the United States in recognition of support given to save its monuments threatened by the Nile. The temple’s setting in The Sackler Wing was designed to approximate the light and surroundings of its original location in Nubia, including a reflecting pool that evokes the Nile. Learn more about the Temple of Dendur: http://bit.ly/25wY97t View all videos in the series: http://www.metmuseum.org/information/met-360-project Production Credits Director/Producer: Nina Diamond Production: Total Cinema 360 | Koncept VR Composer: Simon Fisher Turner Graphics: Natasha Mileshina
Views: 18178 The Met
The Met 360° Project: Great Hall
 
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Architect Richard Morris Hunt designed this majestic space in 1902. He never could have imagined that today the Museum's main entry greets more than six million visitors a year. Now you can experience its Neoclassical grandeur in a way no one ever has before. Come explore not just behind the scenes, but everywhere in 360°. This video lets you soar past the colonnades, up toward the oculus in the ceiling, and cast a look down over the Grand Staircase and balcony. Aren't you curious who creates those colossal flower arrangements when you're still asleep? Learn more about the Great Hall in this 82nd & Fifth episode: http://met.org/20KyEeS View all videos in the series: http://www.metmuseum.org/information/met-360-project Production Credits Director/Producer: Nina Diamond Production: Total Cinema 360 | Koncept VR Composer: Simon Fisher Turner Graphics: Natasha Mileshina
Views: 28852 The Met
82nd & Fifth: "Enamored" by Sean Hemingway
 
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http://www.metmuseum.org/82nd-and-fifth/enamored Explore this object: http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/bronze-statue-of-eros-sleeping-greek-43.11.4 It's so quiet that you don't think of it as so radical, but actually it's very rare and unusual to show a god sleeping. 82nd & Fifth invites 100 curators from across the Museum to talk about 100 works of art that changed the way they see the world. iPad App available in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/82nd-fifth-from-the-met/id903909632?ls=1&mt=8
Views: 14473 The Met
Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination Gallery Views
 
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The Met Fifth Avenue: Medieval, Byzantine, Lehman Galleries Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2018 exhibition, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The Costume Institute's spring 2018 exhibition features a dialogue between fashion and medieval art from The Met collection to examine fashion's ongoing engagement with the devotional practices and traditions of Catholicism. The Byzantine galleries at The Met Fifth Avenue focus on designers who were inspired by the interiors of Byzantine churches, while the Medieval and Lehman galleries feature designs inspired by the holy ordering of the Catholic Church. #MetHeavenlyBodies https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2018/heavenly-bodies The exhibition is made possible by Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman and Versace. Additional support is provided by Condé Nast. Credits: Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Sarah Cowan Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Jib and Steadicam: Kelly Richardson Additional Camera: Sarah Cowan Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin, Christopher Yurnet Production Assistants: Bryan Martin, Kimberly Cionca Sebesanu Original Music: Austin Fisher © 2018 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 154137 The Met
Duncan Phyfe Low-Relief Carving: Craftsman Allan Breed Carves a Bow Knot and Thunderbolt Crest
 
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Related exhibition: Duncan Phyfe Master Cabinetmaker in New York December 20, 2011 -- May 6, 2012 A characteristic feature of the Grecian-style chairs and sofas made in the Phyfe shop before 1820 is the low-relief carving in the scrolled crests depicting a variety of classical motifs. Included among these motifs are classical swags; sheaves of wheat and cornucopias, emblems of good fortune and plenty; Roman fasces, composed of a battle axe bound within a bundle of rods, a symbol of strength in unity; and clusters of thunderbolts tied in a bowknot, an attribute of the Greek god Zeus, whose vaunted eagle messenger is often depicted clutching one in his talons. This latter motif is found on scroll-back chairs and a sofa from the three documented sets made in the Phyfe shop for the wealthy New York merchant William Bayard (1761--1826) in 1807. three different hands at work in the low-relief carving on this seating furniture, which indicates that Phyfe either employed three carvers in his workshop or subcontracted the work to a specialty carving shop that employed several experienced carvers. The video shown here presents the three varieties of carving on the Bayard seating furniture, and also features a professional carver, Allan Breed, explicating the art and mystery of carving a low-relief bowknot and thunderbolt on a scrolled crest-rail panel. A Production of the Digital Media Department, MMA Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Director of Photography: Wayne de la Roche Editor: Corinne Colgan Gaffer: Dave Hallas Sound Recording: Fred Burnham Production Assistant: Seth Uhlin Scholarly Consultant: Peter Kenny
Views: 49563 The Met