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The Sudan - Land of the Blacks - Land of the Pyramids - Part 1
 
09:36
Crossing the vast northern Sudanese desert and sailing up the Nile all the way to Khartoum. Along the way we find the pyramids of Meroe. A very good documentary about Sudan and the kingdoms / Culture of Nubia (Northern Sudan / Southern Egypt) Although it suffers from the slant of western media repeating some of the same misconceptions Dr. Keita has has explained in the other series, it is well worth the attention. Enjoy - Rate - Comment.
Views: 36551 AfricaTeacher
The Sudan - Land of the Blacks - Land of the Pyramids - Part 5
 
09:36
Crossing the vast northern Sudanese desert and sailing up the Nile all the way to Khartoum. Along the way we find the pyramids of Meroe. A very good documentary about Sudan and the kingdoms / Culture of Nubia (Northern Sudan / Southern Egypt) Although it suffers from the slant of western media repeating some of the same misconceptions Dr. Keita has has explained in the other series, it is well worth the attention. Enjoy - Rate - Comment
Views: 20179 AfricaTeacher
The Sudan - Land of the Blacks - Land of the Pyramids - Part 3
 
09:36
Crossing the vast northern Sudanese desert and sailing up the Nile all the way to Khartoum. Along the way we find the pyramids of Meroe. A very good documentary about Sudan and the kingdoms / Culture of Nubia (Northern Sudan / Southern Egypt) Although it suffers from the slant of western media repeating some of the same misconceptions Dr. Keita has has explained in the other series, it is well worth the attention. Enjoy - Rate - Comment
Views: 46206 AfricaTeacher
The Sudan - Land of the Blacks - Land of the Pyramids - Part 4
 
09:36
Crossing the vast northern Sudanese desert and sailing up the Nile all the way to Khartoum. Along the way we find the pyramids of Meroe. A very good documentary about Sudan and the kingdoms / Culture of Nubia (Northern Sudan / Southern Egypt) Although it suffers from the slant of western media repeating some of the same misconceptions Dr. Keita has has explained in the other series, it is well worth the attention. Enjoy - Rate - Comment
Views: 21165 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - Limb Proportions, and Living population example of the Egyptian mummy skeletal type
 
03:21
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples.
Views: 6750 AfricaTeacher
Les Percussions de Guinee Les Genies du Djembe - African Drumming - Preview
 
09:11
Djembe playing at its best These are some of the best players in Africa, all on the same stage. Les Percussions de Guinee was founded in 1987 by the Ministry of Information, Culture, and Tourism of the Republic of Guinea. It is a government sponsored national ballet of the finest percussionists, musicians, and dancers from Guinea, West Africa. They present a performance inspired by traditional music set in a modern scenic presentation. The group is naturally oriented toward the music of the Guinean highland and the coastal region known for the djembe drum, but their influences are also drawn from the Guinea midland and the forest regions as well. In the tradition of the griots, the history of many of the ethnic groups is told through the medium of drum and dance performance. African-styled performing arts has transmitted traditional values, actual histories, and the spiritual energy of the African people for centuries. The fifteen-member ensemble includes seven master drummers, chosen among the best soloists of Guinea's national companies, as well as members playing flute, balafon, kora, and traditional dancers. About the Djembe A djembe (pronounced /ˈdʒɛmbeɪ/ JEM-bay) also known as djimbe, jenbe, jymbe, jembe,yembe, or jimbay, or sanbanyi in Susu; is a skin covered hand drum, shaped like a large goblet, and meant to be played with bare hands. According to the Bamana people in Mali, the name of the djembe comes directly from the saying "Anke dje, anke be" which literally translates to "everyone gather together", and defines the drum's purpose. "Dje" is the verb for "gather" in Bamanakan, and "be" translates as "everyone" in Bamanakan. It is a member of the membranophone family of musical instruments: a frame or shell (in the djembe's case it is a shell) covered by a membrane or drumhead made of one of many products, usually rawhide. Djembes are commonly about 12" (30 cm) in diameter and 24" (60 cm) in height, varying a few inches. They can also be found at many smaller sizes, from 5" (13 cm) up to 18" (46 cm) in diameter. As a result of the goblet shape, the density of the wood, the internal carvings, and the skin, there is a wide range of tones that can be produced by the djembe. The rounded shape with the extended tube of the djembe body forms a device known in physics as a Helmholtz resonator, giving it the deep bass note. The primary notes are generally referred to as "bass", "tone" and "slap", though a variety of other tones can be produced by advanced players. The slap has a high, sharp sound and the tone is more "round" and full. The bass is the lowest. Some consider the ashiko to be male and the djembe female. There is general agreement that the origin of the djembe is associated with a class of Mandinka/Susu blacksmiths known as Numu. The wide dispersion of the djembe drums throughout West Africa may be due to Numu migrations dating from the first millennium A.D. Despite the associations of the djembe with the Numu, there do not appear to be hereditary restrictions upon who can play the djembe as occurs with some other African instruments. Traditionally crafted djembe drums are carved in one single piece from hollowed out hardwood trees. Specific types of wood depend upon the forests accessible to the drum makers. Some West African hardwoods used for musician quality instruments (carved in Guinea, Senegal, Mali, and Cote' Divore) include dimba (bush mango), lenge, bois rouge, acajou, iroko, hare or khadi, and dugura. National Ensemble of the Republic of Guinea. Recorded on location at the Peoples Palace Conakry Guinea, Agust, 2000
Views: 98569 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - Ancient Egypt, Its Neolithic History and its Sudanese & Saharan Connections
 
03:47
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples.
Views: 6528 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - The Bio Cultural Origins of Egypt - Part 4
 
09:36
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples. In this 6 Part Lecture Keita speaks on the "Bio-Cultural" Origins and aspects of the Ancient populations of the Nile Valley. He includes details on the Afro-Asiatic Language Family, Genetics of the P2 Clade, Skull Measurements and Limb Proportions. ENJOY! All comments are welcomed, inappropriate comments will be removed.
Views: 8279 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - Origins and Misconceptions of Egypt and Nile Valley inhabitants
 
08:36
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples.
Views: 11625 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - Afrocentrism, Eurocentrism, The Reinforcement of African Diversity.
 
07:51
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples.
Views: 11709 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y.  Keita The Bio Cultural Origins of Egypt - Part 6
 
01:34
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples. In this 6 Part Lecture Keita speaks on the "Bio-Cultural" Origins and aspects of the Ancient populations of the Nile Valley. He includes details on the Afro-Asiatic Language Family, Genetics of the P2 Clade, Skull Measurements and Limb Proportions. ENJOY! All comments are welcomed, inappropriate comments will be removed
Views: 4618 AfricaTeacher
The Sudan - Land of the Blacks - Land of the Pyramids - Part 2
 
09:36
Crossing the vast northern Sudanese desert and sailing up the Nile all the way to Khartoum. Along the way we find the pyramids of Meroe. A very good documentary about Sudan and the kingdoms / Culture of Nubia (Northern Sudan / Southern Egypt) Although it suffers from the slant of western media repeating some of the same misconceptions Dr. Keita has has explained in the other series, it is well worth the attention. Enjoy - Rate - Comment
Views: 14938 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - The Bio Cultural Origins of Egypt - Part 3
 
09:36
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples. In this 6 Part Lecture Keita speaks on the "Bio-Cultural" Origins and aspects of the Ancient populations of the Nile Valley. He includes details on the Afro-Asiatic Language Family, Genetics of the P2 Clade, Skull Measurements and Limb Proportions. ENJOY! All comments are welcomed, inappropriate comments will be removed.
Views: 7323 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - The Bio Cultural Origins of Egypt - Part 1
 
09:36
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples. In this 6 Part Lecture Keita speaks on the "Bio-Cultural" Origins and aspects of the Ancient populations of the Nile Valley. He includes details on the Afro-Asiatic Language Family, Genetics of the P2 Clade, Skull Measurements and Limb Proportions. ENJOY! All comments are welcomed, inappropriate comments will be removed. Annotations and Scientific Studies: -3:05 - And What 2 places does the Nile Begin? Where does the White Nile and Blue Nile join? Late Pleistocene and Holocene environmental and climatic change from Lake Tana, source of the Blue Nile http://tiny.cc/Nile The RIver Nile http://tiny.cc/Nile935 The Inscrutable Nile At The Beginning of the New Millennium. http://tiny.cc/Nile489 4:00 - Absolutely NO evidence of major migration from outside Africa. Not Syria, nor Mesopotamia, nor Europe. Colloquium on Predynastic and Early Dynastic Egypt. http://www.origins3.org.uk/abstracts.html Naqada II in Upper Egypt http://www.faiyum.com/html/naqada_ii_.html#NIIUE Studies and Comments on Ancient Egyptian Biological Relationships. http://wysinger.homestead.com/keita-1993.pdf 4:46 - Afro-Asiatic has a home in Africa, Probably Ethiopia. Of the 7 {Possibly 8} Language groups in the family, only 1 made its way out of Africa Semitic. And even that is under debate. - See 9:08 Origins of Afroasiatic http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/citation/306/5702/1680c Afroasiatic Comparative Lexica: Implications for Long (and Medium) Range Language Comparison http://tiny.cc/QGTc8 Afro-Asiatic and Semitic genealogical trees, presented by Alexander Militarev http://tiny.cc/MXOq4 The Origin of AfroAsiatic http://wysinger.homestead.com/afroasiatic_-_keita.pdf The Afroasiatic Language Phylum: African in Origin or Asian? http://www.jstor.org/pss/2744394 4:58 - Omotic as well as Ongota once labeled as Cushitic could in fact be language isolates and not Afro-Asiatic at all. OR they were possible the first to diverge. Beja, also sometimes classified as Cushitic could also be a separate family in the Afro-Asiatic Phylum Is Omotic Afroasiatic? http://tiny.cc/JhrWz Beja Linguistic Research http://www.kwedekind.de/Eingang1/PDF-Papers.htm 7:42 Not surprisingly, downstream mutations {Sub-Clades} of the East African Y-Chromosome marker M35* {which origin is in Ethiopia} follows a similar distribution. We will come to genetics of the P2 Clade later. A Back Migration from Asia to Sub-Saharan Africa Is Supported by High-Resolution Analysis of Human Y Chromosome Haplotypes. http://tiny.cc/l1nJD Phylogeographic Analysis of Haplogroup E3b (E-M215) Y Chromosomes Reveals Multiple Migratory Events Within and Out Of Africa http://tiny.cc/OcKWp Molecular Dissection of the Y Chromosome Haplogroup E-M78 (E3b1a): A Posteriori Evaluation of a Microsatellite-Network-Based Approach Through Six New Biallelic Markers http://tiny.cc/QpeSt Tracing Past Human Male Movements in Northern/Eastern Africa and Western Eurasia: New Clues from Y-Chromosomal Haplogroups E-M78 and J-M12 http://tiny.cc/lVxRG Y-Chromosome Variation Among Sudanese: Restricted Gene Flow, Concordance With Language, Geography, and History http://tiny.cc/ZoxOi 9:25 - Minority View - Origin of Semitic under debate.
Views: 12649 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - The Bio Cultural Origins of Egypt - Part 5
 
09:36
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples. In this 6 Part Lecture Keita speaks on the "Bio-Cultural" Origins and aspects of the Ancient populations of the Nile Valley. He includes details on the Afro-Asiatic Language Family, Genetics of the P2 Clade, Skull Measurements and Limb Proportions. ENJOY! All comments are welcomed, inappropriate comments will be removed.
Views: 7158 AfricaTeacher
The Sudan - Land of the Blacks - Land of the Pyramids - Part 6
 
02:35
Crossing the vast northern Sudanese desert and sailing up the Nile all the way to Khartoum. Along the way we find the pyramids of Meroe. A very good documentary about Sudan and the kingdoms / Culture of Nubia (Northern Sudan / Southern Egypt) Although it suffers from the slant of western media repeating some of the same misconceptions Dr. Keita has has explained in the other series, it is well worth the attention. Enjoy - Rate - Comment
Views: 15230 AfricaTeacher
Babongo of Gabon - The Iboga Ritual - Part 7
 
01:18
Interesting Video The guy in the film lives with them for a while and goes through the ritual. They give him TONS of Iboga. There was even a point where they didnt want to give it to him as they though the may die. I am satisfied that he doesnt trivialize the experience either, as we would see in other videos. It was very real. Babongo The Babongo of Gabon have an expertise and knowledge of the forests and are unique in their use of Iboga. Iboga is a powerful hallucinogenic which lies at the heart of Babongo culture and Bwiti religion making them famous throughout Gabon. The Babongo have recently changed from being nomadic hunter-gatherers to settled villagers with subsistence agriculture supplemented by hunting. Bwiti Bwiti is a West Central African religion practiced by the forest-dwelling Babongo and Mitsogo people of Gabon (where it is one of the three official religions) and the Fang people of Gabon and Cameroon. Modern Bwiti is syncretistic, incorporating animism, ancestor worship and Christianity into its belief system. Bwiti use the hallucinogenic rootbark of the Tabernanthe iboga plant, specially cultivated for the religion, to induce a spiritual enlightenment, stabilize community and family structure, meet religious requirements and to solve problems of a spiritual and/or medical nature. The root bark has been used for hundreds of years as part of a Bwiti coming of age ceremony and other initiation rites and acts of healing, producing complex visions and insights anticipated to be valuable to the initiate and the chapel. The root bark or its extract is taken in doses high enough to cause vomiting and ataxia as common side effects. More about Iboga Tabernanthe iboga or Iboga is a perennial rainforest shrub and hallucinogen, native to western Central Africa. Iboga stimulates the central nervous system when taken in small doses and induces visions in larger doses. In parts of Africa where the plant grows the bark of the root is chewed for various pharmacological or ritualistic purposes. Ibogaine, the active alkaloid, is also used to treat substance abuse disorders. Normally growing to a height of 2 m, T. iboga may eventually grow into a small tree up to 10 m tall, given the right conditions. It has small green leaves. Its flowers are white and pink, while the elongated, oval-shaped fruit are orange. Its yellow-coloured roots contains a number of indole alkaloids, most notablyibogaine, which is found in the highest concentration in the root-bark. The root material, bitter in taste, causes an anaesthetic sensation in the mouth as well as systemic numbness to the skin. The Iboga tree is the central pillar of the Bwiti religion practiced in West-Central Africa, mainly Gabon,Cameroon and the Republic of the Congo, which utilizes the alkaloid-containing roots of the plant in a number of ceremonies. Iboga is taken in massive doses by initiates when entering the religion, and on a more regular basis is eaten in smaller doses in connection with rituals and tribal dances, which is usually performed at night time.
Views: 20318 AfricaTeacher
Suri / Surma of - Ethiopia Amazing Stick fighting - Part 7
 
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The Suri The Suri, also known as the Surma is a population numbering around 20 thousand that live in Southwestern Ethiopian by the Sudanese Border. The Suri, along with the Mursi and Meen all speak languages that belong to the Surmic language family under the larger Nilo-Saharan language phylum. The Suri, Mursi, and Meen are sometimes all referred to collectively as Surma numbering collectively around 80 Thousand. Cattle Culture Cattle are enormously important to the Suri. They bring status; when two Suri meet they'll ask each other how many cows they have. Cows are a store of wealth to be traded, and a source of milk and blood. Bleeding a cow is more efficient than slaughtering it for meat, and blood can be drawn during the dry season when there's less milk. An animal can be bled once a month, from the jugular. The animals aren't generally sold or killed for meat, though they are slaughtered for certain ceremonies. They are treated with reverence. Fires are lit to keep them warm and to protect against insect bites, they are covered with ash. Every boy is given a young bull to look after, and his friends call him the name of his bull. The Suri sing songs in praise of their cattle, and mourn them when they die. Stick Fighting A sport and ritual the Suri take extremely seriously is stick fighting. In many cases, its a way for young men to prove themselves to the young women. The fights are held between Suri villages and the fights begin with 20 to 30 people on each side. Of these 20 to 30 people, all get a chance to fight one on one against someone from the other side. During these fights there are referees present to make sure all rules are being followed. Many stick fights end within the first couple of hits. Sociolinguistic Survey Report on Tirma, Chai, Baale, and Mursi. http://www.sil.org/silesr/2002/033/SILESR2002-033.pdf Language Family Trees Nilo-Saharan http://www.ethnologue.com/show_family.asp?subid=90116 Enjoy this Video, Rate and comment. Thanks
Views: 15263 AfricaTeacher
S.O.Y. Keita - The Bio Cultural Origins of Egypt - Part 2
 
09:36
Shomarka Omar Yahya M.D., DPhil., née Jon Derryll Walker, is an African American physician and anthropologist. He is affiliated with the National Human Genome Center of Howard University and the Department of Anthropology of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been interested in the origins of the concepts of race, the misconception of human variation as race, and the scientific approaches to the biocultural origins and histories of indigenous African peoples. In this 6 Part Lecture Keita speaks on the "Bio-Cultural" Origins and aspects of the Ancient populations of the Nile Valley. He includes details on the Afro-Asiatic Language Family, Genetics of the P2 Clade, Skull Measurements and Limb Proportions. ENJOY! All comments are welcomed, inappropriate comments will be removed. Annotations: 3:45 - Just one of many reasons why its useless to separate "North Africa" from "Sub-Sahara" when there has not always been a Sahara Desert. It expanded and retracted throughout African pre-history. 4:13 - Africans have always lived Above, Within and Below the Sahara, and they continue to do so still to this day
Views: 8553 AfricaTeacher